Best dating a catholic woman marrying an egyptian man

best dating a catholic woman marrying an egyptian man

In between my holidays in Egypt we wrote and called eachother a lot. As I arrived the next time in Hurgada, we’d known eachother for 10 months, he proposed to get married and sign the orfi contract at a sollicitors office. I didn’t really understand what he meant, but het explained me that in that way we could share a hotelroom as we were going to Luxor. Later on we could get married in the official way, I agreed.

best dating a catholic woman marrying an egyptian man

by Melissa Garcia I looked down at my text messages. “My friend Kim started a relationship with a Muslim man. She is a ‘strong Christian’ and I have serious concerns. She will be calling you.” Then another text. “Hi. I’m Kim. Can we talk?” I picked up the phone and asked her a few questions to help me understand her circumstances.

I saw more than one red flag. Here’s what I said. I am married to an Arab. He was a Christian when I met him but comes from a Muslim family. I must tell you plainly, that the only reason our marriage works is because of our mutual faith in Jesus.

Our cultural differences run deep and resurface at the most inconvenient times. To be blunt, I strongly recommend ending this relationship, not only for theological reasons, but for practical reasons as well. Theologically Biblically, Christians are to marry Christians.

This is for our good and God’s glory. The Bible teaches that light cannot mix with darkness. It also teaches that our marriage relationship reflects Christ and the Church. Without a common faith in Jesus, we are outside of God’s will and cannot experience God’s wonderful design for marriage (2 Corinthians 2:16; Ephesians 5:22-33). Consider also what Islam teaches about women, marriage, and family. Even if he is not practicing now, he may one day.

He may become more devout as life circumstances change, such as having children. See: . He may tell you that it is “okay” for you to be married despite your different faiths. This is because to Muslims, Islam is the final religion and his religion supersedes your relationship with God.

Muslim men are allowed, and even encouraged, to marry Christian women. Taking a Christian wife spreads Islam by preventing the woman from marrying a Christian man and having Christian children. Raising children in a cross-cultural marriage has its challenges. Both partners sacrifice to accommodate the other’s preferences and expectations. The Bible instructs Christian parents to raise children in the training and instruction of the Lord (Proverbs 22:6, Ephesians 6:4).

For a woman married to a Muslim man, this scripture becomes impossible according to both Christian and Islamic doctrines. Interfaith marriage inhibits Biblical partnership in parenting, while in Islam, children born to a Muslim father are automatically born Muslim. Hear from a Christian from a Muslim background on the Islamic doctrine of women and .

Finally, if he expresses a spiritual interest, who can discern his interest and guide him towards Jesus. Continuing the relationship to change or convert him is unfair to him. Practically I married a Christian man, but I married into a Muslim family. Our values and beliefs cut to the core of who we are. Cultural differences run deep, even within our pluralistic society. For example, Muslims and Christians both value marriage and family. However, we differ in purpose, structure, and attributes which we associate with “traditional.” The Qur’an upholds both abuse and polygamy.

Even if your romantic interest rejects such actions, are you willing to bear children (e.g., a daughter) into the religion? Are you willing to sacrificially care for his parents as they age, as is expected?

What about when your potential husband faces his own abuse or dysfunction from his upbringing? Listen to Kelly, who married a Turkish Muslim, share her story ( , ) on Crescent Project Radio. The allure of a foreign or minority husband might be exhilarating. Your relationship might also frighten your closest friends and families. Proverbs 15:22 says, “Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with many advisers they succeed.” I encourage you to hear your confidants’ concerns.

They may be valid, as they were for this couple who lost their daughter to Islam ( , ). A wise woman once told me, “Cross-cultural marriages are hard. Never marry someone from another culture without being certain it is God’s will.

Marriage is hard. Cross-cultural marriages are hard. I can’t even imagine the difficulty and pain of a marriage without Jesus as the center.” Melissa Garcia and her Arab husband serve with Crescent Project. Melissa has been engaging Muslims since 1999 in the US, France and North Africa.

Melissa holds a master’s degree in public affairs from University of Texas at Austin. ©Crescent Project 2017


best dating a catholic woman marrying an egyptian man

best dating a catholic woman marrying an egyptian man - Considerations for Marrying a Muslim Man — Crescent Project


best dating a catholic woman marrying an egyptian man

Translations of this item: • • • Note to readers: This weblog entry on official advice to women not to marry Muslim men has, to my surprise and delight, become the springboard for an intense, heated, and personal dialogue between non-Muslim women romantically involved with Muslim men.

Judging by a number of testimonies, the site has proved valuable to many women benefiting from advice and the sharing of information; for a couple of examples see the postings by , , , and Cindy (starting , continuing , and ending ). Others have found solace in kindred spirits (see the posting of ). Still others have drawn conclusions from their own experience and offered these for general use (see the posting of ). After a slow start, the discussion took off and now has 17,000 comments, or about four a day.

I believe this to be a premier website for this topic. From the perspective of , about one in eighteen comments on the website are on this page. Asking for Advice: Readers are requested to offer counsel: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • The consular bureau at the U.S. Department of State from the mid-1990s until 2000 distributed a document titled "," offering straight-talking advice to American women contemplating tying the knot with Saudi men.

As Martin Kramer describes what he calls "a minor classic by an anonymous diplomat": It is remarkable for its undiplomatic and anecdotal tone, so distant from the department's standard bureaucratic style. For prospective spouses, "Marriage to Saudis" constituted an official tutorial in Saudi culture; for others, it served as a fascinating example of practical anthropology, school of hard knocks. Here is a choice excerpt: The donning of the black abayas and face veils ...

the Saudi-American relationship virtually always blossoms in the States, in a climate that allows dating, cohabitation, children out of wedlock, religious diversity, and a multitude of other Islamic sins which go unnoticed by Saudi relatives and religious leaders thousands of miles away. American citizen wives swear that the transformation in their Saudi husbands occurs during the transatlantic flight to the Kingdom. There is the universal recollection of approaching Riyadh and witnessing the donning of the black abayas and face veils by the fashionably dressed Saudi women.

For many women, the Saudi airport is the first time they see their husband in Arab dress (i.e., the thobe and ghutra). For those American women reluctant to wear an abaya (the all-encompassing black cloak) and for those Saudi husbands who did not make an issue of the abaya prior to arriving, the intense public scrutiny that starts at the airport—given to a western woman who is accompanying a Saudi male—is usually the catalyst for the eventual covering up.

Since the overwhelming majority of American citizen wives never travel to the Kingdom prior to their marriage, they are abruptly catapulted into Saudi society.

That document comes to mind in light of the Vatican's release of Erga migrantes caritas Christi (""), an 80-page booklet issued by the Pontifical Council for the Care of Migrants and Itinerant People. Despite its affectionate title, the document includes a warning against Catholic women marrying Muslim men. Here is the key passage: When, for example, a Catholic woman and a Muslim wish to marry, ... bitter experience teaches us that a particularly careful and in-depth preparation is called for.

During it the two fiancés will be helped to know and consciously "assume" the profound cultural and religious differences they will have to face, both between themselves and in relation to their respective families and the Muslim's original environment, to which they may possibly return after a period spent abroad.

If the marriage is registered with a consulate of the Islamic country of origin, the Catholic party must beware of reciting or signing documents containing the shahada (profession of the Muslim belief). In any case, the marriage between a Catholic and a Muslim, if celebrated in spite of all this, requires not only canonical dispensation but also the support of the Catholic community both before and after the marriage.

One of the most important tasks of Catholic associations, volunteer workers and counselling services will be to help these families educate their children and, if need be, to support the least protected member of the Muslim family, that is the woman, to know and insist on her rights.

It's remarkable that, multiculturalism notwithstanding, such institutions as the U.S. government and the Vatican are warning women away from inter-religious marriages. (May 16, 2004) Dec.

1, 2005 update: Cardinal , president of the Italian Bishops Conference and a right-hand man to Pope Benedict XVI, issued a statement yesterday on behalf of the conference, warning against Catholics marrying Muslims.

"In addition to the problems that any couple encounters when forming a family, Catholics and Muslims have to reckon with the difficulties that inevitably arise from deep cultural differences." He also noted that it is usually a Catholic woman who marries a Muslim men, that usually she converts, not he, and their children tend to be brought up as Muslims.

Further, if an Italian woman marries a Muslim immigrant and they move to his country of origin, her rights are "not guaranteed in the way they are in Italy or in other Western nations." Such marriages, the statement concluded, should therefore be discouraged.

Dec. 26, 2005 update: , a Japanese Catholic cardinal, wrote in 2004 about the "bitter experiences" of European women who marry Muslims. Aug. 23, 2007 update: The Kamil Internaltional Ministries Organization of Raleigh, North Carolina, has published a tract, "" It begins by contrasting verses from the Koran and New Testament: • "Husband, beat your wives and deny them sex." (Koran 4:34) • "Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the Church and gave Himself for her." (Ephesians 5:25) It then goes on to offer a stark "Preview": Because our country receives people of all nationalities, cultures and religions, you may meet and develop a relationship with a Muslim man.

He may be especially attractive because of his dark good looks, education, financial means and the interest he shows in you. You may be excited that you have found the 'tall, dark and handsome man' you have been looking for.

His sweet words and attention may blind you regarding the influence of his Muslim religion and culture. Because we have freedom of religion, he may agree that you can keep your religion and you may think there will be no problem with such a marriage. Do not be deceived and become a victim of his religion which has very oppressive rules regarding women's status and rights.

Such a marriage will cause you great heartache. The rest of the tract consists of quotations from the Koran and the Hadith, followed by various counsels: Do not be naive and become a victim. Very often there is a motive behind such a marriage. While you may be in love, a Muslim man could just be using you to obtain legal immigrant status and citizenship. ... You must be warned that Islam is more than a religion; it is a way of life, a complete code of the 7th Century pagan Arabian culture that Muslims want to force non-Muslims to adopt.

If there is ever a dispute between you and your Muslim husband, he only needs to travel to a Muslim country and Islamic law, which favor men, would apply. ... The Muslim's mind is ingrained with the teachings of the Koran and his Muslim culture which favor men. It does not matter whether he practices Islam or not. ... Becoming a Muslim's wife would mean you are sacrificing your freedom. ... If you hope to have a successful married life, consider finding a Christian man.

... If you are married to a Muslim, never even consider giving up your Lord and Savior Jesus Christ under any situations. June 25, 2008 update: But not all the advice against intermarriage is directed to non-Muslim women. AKI reports today that, in response to the growing number of Moroccan women who are marrying European men, Sheikh , Morocco insisted in an interview with Al-Arabiya television that marriage between Moroccan women and non-Muslim European men is unacceptable.

"This kind of marriage, between Moroccan women and European men, is forbidden by the Koran and the Sunna. A Muslim woman may not marry an unbeliever while a Muslim man may marry Christian and Jewish women." If the European men convert to Islam, that changes everything, he went on; then, Moroccan women may marry them.

"Islam only requires two witnesses for someone to be able to convert and [then] such a marriage is valid." But this is not to be undertaken lightly: "If a European then decides to abandon Islam, Muhammad's words apply to him: those who renounce their own religion must be killed, as they are apostates." Tawil's position represents classic Shari'a but it contravenes the 2005 reforms of the Mudawana, Morocco's family law, which eased the way for foreigners to marry Moroccan women.

Indeed, almost 6,000 such marriages were registered in Morocco in 2007 – about six times as many as a decade earlier and more than the number of Moroccan men who married foreign women that year (which was just over 4,300). Dec. 1, 2008 update: Asked about mixed marriages, , the new secretary-general of the Italian Bishops' Conference, replied that they are not encouraging, because with the passage of time there is often a return to [the spouses'] cultural, social, religious, and legal origins, with sometimes dramatic consequences, which the children pay for.

Jose Policarpo, head of the Catholic church in Portugal. Jan. 14, 2009 update: Another cardinal weighs in, this time the head of the Catholic Church in Portugal, . He advised Christians to respect Muslims and to learn more about Islam. But he said warned Portuguese women from marrying Muslim men: "Think twice before marrying a Muslim, think very carefully. You can get into a whole lot of trouble, and not even Allah knows where it might end." July 17, 2011 update: A group called The Organization for Prevention of Assimilation in the Holy Land, going by the abbreviation , is "defending the daughters of Israel" on the country's beaches.

As Yediot Ahronot explains: According to the organization, many Arab men are posing as Jews, courting and harassing the beautiful women. In response, a "coast guard" aimed at fighting the alleged phenomenon has been set up. In recent weeks, Lehava members have been handing out dozens of leaflets to Jewish women on the beaches of Bat Yam, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Caesarea and Eilat, asking them to maintain their Jewishness and not to give in to the non-Jewish men's appeals.

The organization decided to do something after receiving complaints from many women who claimed to be harassed by non-Jewish men on the beach. "Last year we discovered that there are many gentiles arriving at the beaches, but not in search of the sun or water," said Benzi Gopstein, one of Lehava's leaders. "Due to the multiple complaints," he explained, "we decided to promote a campaign at the start of the bathing season this year in order to prevent situations in which girls discover that the 'Yossi' they are dating is actually 'Yusuf', prevent sexual harassment and assimilation.

"The volunteers handing out the leaflets are all seculars, as the religious public only visits segregated beaches, which don't have the Arab problem. We've also started distributing a clip on Facebook and YouTube and we hope the girls will open their eyes.

... We turn to the girls with a plea: 'There are enough good Jewish men you can go out with'." Aug. 6, 2013 update: This slight blog has over 11,000 comments on it.

One sent today, "" by a woman who calls herself "Another Idiot," sums up the consensus of the thousands who have written in: I would strongly advise to any non-Muslim woman NOT to get involved with a Muslim man. They will NEVER change, no matter how Americanized they seem. Their culture is too ingrained in them.

They might want to be Western and they might live a Western lifestyle with their wife but once you have kids EVERYTHING will change. Nov. 22, 2014 update: For a verse version of the same conclusion, read "" by a woman who lives in Canada. June 28, 2015 update: Four years later, more news about Lehava (see above, July 17, 2011): It now haunts and hands out to women up to 5,000 sweets a night accompanied by a postcard that says: "My sister, I am thinking about you, I feel you.

You have a pure Jewish soul! Don't get lost, don't go with Mahmoud. He'll start by being sweet and then he'll start to beat ... reaching out to help you, Lehava." Jewish Home 2018 election campaign poster in Ramle. Oct. 2, 2018 update: The 19,000 comments on this page mainly present non-Muslim women's unhappy experiences with Middle Eastern men.

But few can match the misery of – she was arrested as a result of her romance with Nadal Diya and faces a federal charge of obstruction of justice – as recounted in the Washington Post, "NCIS special agent told lover he was target of a terrorism investigation, prosecutors say." (NCIS stands for Naval Criminal Investigative Service.) Oct. 16, 2018 update: The Israeli political party (Bayit Yehudi) posted campaign ads in the town of Ramle showing a young woman in a black hijab (a Muslim head-covering) against a backdrop of two white candles, wine, and a wine cup (items used at the start of the Jewish Sabbath); the implication is that the woman converted from Judaism to Islam.

The text on the poster then calls for votes to prevent this from happening: "Hundreds of incidents of assimilation in Ramle, and nobody cares. Tomorrow it could be your daughter. Only a strong Jewish Home will keep Ramle Jewish."


best dating a catholic woman marrying an egyptian man

In the United States, they may be legally married. Biblically, it would be wrong for someone who considers herself Christian, such as a Catholic, to marry someone who does not. "Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness?" 2 Corinthians 6:14 _________________________________________ Yes, a Muslim man can marry a Catholic woman.

It is not required for a Catholic woman to convert to Islam to marry a Muslim man. Per Islam teachings and rules, it is allowed for a Muslim man to marry a Christian (Catholic, Orthodox, or Protestant, Jewish, or Muslim woman.

This comes from the fact that per Islam and Quran teachings, Christians and Jews worship same God worshiped by Muslims and; accordingly; they are not called unbelievers but are called holders of the book as they are holders of the Bible and the Torah that Muslims believe they are God holy books as the Quran is.

However, as the husband, per Islam teachings, is responsible of the family financial responsibilities and expenses (even if the wife works, she is allowed not to spend on family cost of living) and the children bear the father name, children are raised up as Muslims until they become mature enough to chose their religion per their free will. The Christian or Jewish woman after marriage is allowed to practice her ritual worship at home as well as in the church. Yes,That is possible in Islam __________________________________________ Yes, a Catholic woman can marry a Muslim man.

it is not required for a Catholic woman to convert to Islam to marry a Muslim man. Per Islam teachings and rules, it is allowed for a Muslim man to marry a Christian (Catholic, … Orthodox, or Protestant, Jewish, or Muslim woman. This comes from the fact that per Islam and Quran teachings, Christians and Jews worship same God worshiped by Muslims and; accordingly; they are not called unbelievers but are called holders of the book as they are holders of the Bible and the Torah that Muslims believe they are God holy books as the Quran is.

However, as the husband, per Islam teachings, is responsible of the family financial responsibilities and expenses (even if the wife works, she is allowed not to spend on family cost of living) and the children bear the father name, children are raised up as Muslims until they become mature enough to chose their religion per their free will. The Christian or Jewish woman after marriage is allowed to practice her ritual worship at home as well as in the church.

Answer . From the Islamic point of view, yes, if she is a believing, practicing Christian, and agrees to maintain an Islamic atmosphere in the home and raise the children Muslim.. Answer . From the Catholic belief, no, she cannot. A Catholic can only contract a sacramental marriage which must … be to another Catholic, with the ceremony in a Catholic Church and witnessed by a Catholic priest. If she chooses to go ahead anyway, the Church will consider the marriage invalid as well as a statement of apostasy.

In order for the marriage to happen, he would have to convert or at least become baptized while taking instruction. . Answer . Yes,she can marry the Syed but she need to convert her religion first.. Answer . Sahih Bukhari, Volume 7, Book 63, Number 209: . Narrated Nafi':. Whenever Ibn 'Umar was asked about marrying a Christian lady or a Jewess, he would say: " Allah has made it unlawful for the believers to marry ladies who ascribe partners in worship to Allah , and I do not know of a greater thing, as regards to ascribing partners in worship, etc.

to Allah, than that a lady should say that Jesus is her Lord although he is just one of Allah's slaves." No, a Muslim woman must marry a Muslim man and not any other Non-Muslims.. Answer: Outside of Muslim theocracies, yes..

Answer: Any person should be allowed to marry any other person that they choose. The problem comes in getting the civil/religious authorities to put their official stamp on t … he process. This may be required for inheritance rights, survivor benefits, legitimacy of children or similar reasons. Dating someone who is married is considered adultery. It normally does not end well and both parties should think carefully before getting themselves into that kind of situation.

The married woman's spouse could be very upset if they were to find out that she had dated someone else outside matrimony … .

According to the rules and teachings of Islam, a Muslim woman is not allowed to marry a non Muslim man. She should marry only a Muslim man. refer to related question below. . Catholic Answer From a Catholic point of view, No, not without special, express permission from the Bishop. This is … called disparity of cult (marriage between a Catholic and a non-baptized person).

It requires particular attention on the part of the couples and their pastors. Basically, it requires express permission from your bishop. You should talk to your pastor as soon as possible about this. If he approves, then he can get the proper forms submitted to the Chancery for the Bishop's permission.

The following are the relevant paragraphs from the Catechism. from The Catechism of the Catholic Church, second edition, English translation 1994 . 1633 In many countries the situation of a mixed-marriage (marriage between a Catholic and a baptized non-Catholic) often arises. It requires particular attention on the part of the couples and their pastors.

A case of marriage with disparity of cult (between a Catholic and a non-baptized person) requires even greater circumspection. 1634 Difference of confession between the spouses does not constitute an insurmountable obstacle for marriage, when they succeed in placing in common what they have received from their respective communities, and learn from each other the way in which each lives in fidelity to Christ.

But the difficulties of mixed marriages must not be underestimated. They arise from the fact that the separation of Christians has not yet been overcome.

The spouses risk experiencing the tragedy of Christian disunity even in the heart of their own home. Disparity of cult can further aggravate these difficulties. Differences about faith and the very notion of marriage, but also different religious mentalities, can become sources of tension in marriage, especially as regards the education of children. The temptation to religious indifference can then arise. 1635 According to the law in force in the Latin Church, a mixed marriage needs for liceity the express permission of ecclesiastical authority.

(Cf. Codex Iuris Canonici, canon 1124) In case of disparity of cult an express dispensation from this impediment is required for the validity of the marriage. (CF Codex Iuris Canonici, canon 1086) This permission or dispensation presupposes that both parties know and do not exclude the essential ends and properties of marriage; and furthermore that the Catholic party confirms the obligations, which have been made known to the non-Catholic party, of preserving his or her own faith and ensuring the baptism and education of the children in the Catholic Church.

(Cf. Codex Iuris Canonici, canon 1125. 1637 In the marriages with disparity of cult the Catholic spouse has a particular task: "For the unbelieving husband is consecrated through his wife, and the unbelieving wife is consecrated through her husband." ( 1 Cor 7:14) It is a great joy for the Christian spouse and for the Church if this "consecration" should lead to the free conversion of the other spouse to the Christian faith.

(Cf. 1 Cor 7:16) Sincere married love, the humble and patient practice of the family virtues, and perseverance in prayer can prepare the non-believing spouse to accept the grace of conversion.. Theoretically, yes. However, such a mixed marriage would not get off to a great start. The Muslim religion insists that any children be raised as Muslims and the Catholic Church insists they be raised as Catholics.

Answer : Yes, a Catholic may marry a Muslim. However, if the person is a practis … ing Muslim there will certainly be serious problems from the Muslim end. For a Catholic to marry a Muslim, apart from normal marriage preparation classes, and the promise by the Catholic party to try to raise any children as Catholics, the couple must seek permission from the bishop; this would be done by the priest involved.

As one of the parties is non-Christian it would be permissable for the ceremony to take place somewhere other than in a church building. Yes, but only if not previously married and agrees to Catholic party's oath to bring up children Catholic. Other impediments may apply as well. . Catholic Answer Normally a Catholic is forbidden to marry outside the faith. This is known as "disparity of cult" and requires an express dispensation . You would need to speak with your pastor and discuss your reasons for doing this.

If you have good enough reasons - which should be very good, then the non-Catholic can apply for the permission you need if the two of you go through pre-Cana classes, and are showing good faith.

You need to be sure that you can live your faith and raise the children in the faith. As one man I used to work with used to say, "you're going to be dead for a long time." Although I wouldn't use his phrasing, the point is that you are only on earth for a short period of time. The reason God put you on earth is to serve Him and to prepare yourself to enter heaven. In other words, the reason you would marry a non-Catholic is that you somehow discern that it is God's Will for you do so, and that in doing so, you will be furthering the chances of your eternal salvation AND his or hers.

Remember, marriage means that you are responsible for helping your spouse attain heaven, as well as working out your own salvation. My personal advice is to take this very slowly. Take a year or more to make sure that your faith is firmly established, and to get to know this person better so that you are absolutely positive that you are not endangering your soul, or your childrens' souls. Any person that is worthwhile and really loves a Catholic person should be more than willing to genuinely convert and then the two of you would be working together towards the same end.

  from The Catechism of the Catholic Church , second edition, English translation 1994 . 1635 . . . This . . . dispensation presupposes that both parties know and do not exclude the essential ends and properties of marriage; and furthermore that the Cahtolic party confirms the obligations, which have been made known to the non-Catholic party, of preserving his or her own faith and ensuring the baptism and education of the children in the Catholic Church. (Cf. Code of Canon Law, canon 1125.

1637 In marriages with disparity of cult the Catholic spouse has a particular task: "For the unbelieving husband is consecrated through his wife, and the unbelieving wife is consecrated through her husband." ( 1 Cor 7:14) It is a great joy for the Christian spouse and for the church if this "consecration" should lead to the free conversion of the other spouse to the Christian faith.

(Cf. 1 Cor 7:16) Sincere married love, the humble and patient practice of the family virtues, and perseverance in prayer can prepare the non-believing spouse to accept the grace of conversion.. you can convert to Islam but you cant marry a non-muslim because it isn't right. but if it was a man converting to Islam, he can marry a non-muslim women since he has more power over her. unless you tell him to convert to Islam for the sake of god, then its OK but if it was just to marry you then it … wont count.

A: If either partner to a marriage is Catholic, the Catholic Church would require that all children of the marriage be brought up as Catholics. This is considered to be a religious obligation, so if the couple agrees to bring the children up as Muslims, it would be better for her to convert. An … other Answer No, it is not required for a Catholic woman to convert to Islam to marry a Muslim man.

Per Islam teachings and rules, it is allowed for a Muslim man to marry a Christian (Catholic, Orthodox, or Protestant, Jewish, or Muslim woman. This comes from the fact that per Islam and Quran teachings, Christians and Jews worship same God worshiped by Muslims and; accordingly; they are not called unbelievers but are called holders of the book as they are holders of the Bible and the Torah that Muslims believe they are God holy books as the Quran is.

However, as the husband, per Islam teachings, is responsible of the family financial responsibilities and expenses (even if the wife works, she is allowed not to spend on family cost of living) and the children bear the father name, children are raised up as Muslims until they become mature enough to chose their religion per their free will. The Christian or Jewish woman after marriage is allowed to practice her ritual worship at home as well as in the church.

A mixed marriage is a marriage between a Catholic and a non-Catholic. Disparity of Cult is a marriage between a Catholic and a non-baptized person. The later case is a diriment impediment to marriage, which may only be overcome with special permission from the Bishop. However, it is *never* recommen … ded due to the problems involved in the marriage, the danger to the Catholic's faith, and the determent to the children from that marriage.

A: According to the Catholic Church, a Catholic, once baptised, is always a Catholic and so can never truly change his or her religion. While the Church discourages mixed marriages, it would be possible for him to marry a Muslim woman if she is single or widowed, subject to approval by the local … bishop.

Of course, if the Catholic man does not wish to obtain the approval of his bishop, or this is not forthcoming, he can choose to have a civil wedding. Answer B Maybe, this is known as disparity of cult, when a Catholic is seeking marriage with a non-baptized person. It is not usual conducive nor approved, but a dispensation may be secured from the Bishop for such a marriage to take place.

But first of all, I would recommend that the couple attend RCIA class, the Muslim woman will learn more about the faith and have a better idea of what she is getting into, and perhaps even think of converting. Then the couple should talk to their pastor and start seeking the required dispensations and permissions. Before you start this whole process, if the woman is not willing to convert, you should have a long, hard talk with your confessor, and spend a good deal of time in prayer seeking the will of God, NOT telling God what your will is!

Answer C Per Islam rules and teachings, A Catholic man can't marry with a Muslim woman unless he converts to Islam religion with good faith and belief in the authenticity and truthfulness of Islam religion not just on paper to licit the marriage.

Nothing in Islam rules prevents a Catholic man to convert into Islam even if he baptized. On the other hand, the woman may convert to Christianity but in this case she holds responsible of her Choice in front of God on the Day of Resurrection. As all religions emerged from Islam as full submission to until God Quran revelation to prophet Muhammad as the last God holy book.


Muslim Man Marrying a Non-Muslim Women
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