Best dating abuse lesson plans

best dating abuse lesson plans

Contact me for lesson plans. -Samara School counseling - guidance lessons. Samara Carranza Dating Advice For Women. Teaching Safety Teaching Kids Kids Safety Safety Week School Safety Safety Rules Health Lessons Personal Safety Preschool Activities. what is a safe stranger. Dating Advice for Women. How to get a guy to like you. Play Therapy Activities Feelings Activities Health Activities Therapy Worksheets Counseling Activities Book Activities Preschool Activities Communication Activities Kids Therapy. FSGC, Good Touch Bad Touch Coloring and Activity Book on Behance. Jessica Speelman Lessons for elementary students re: sexual abuse prevention Something we don't want to talk about but must. Age appropriate teaching. Karin Mosley.

best dating abuse lesson plans

I agree that this is not the topic you should be addressing in English class in Middle School Korea. If you were a full time teacher in your home country, charged with the actual care and education of the children (if their age was appropriate) then by all means look into teaching the subject.

However, as we are Guest English Teachers, it is not our role to teach such a topic. That said, I agree that it isn't addressed much in school from what I know - but then there are many things that happen in my school that I am unaware of.

Ummm....yeah probably not a good idea. Even if it was high school you are the English teacher and it's not really your place (were you trained?).

Korea is fairly conservative, especially at PS school and you might end up getting a lot of parental complaints. If your heart is super set on it, run the lesson past your head of English first. Don't go unilateral on this one. Also, you might need him/her to translate some of what you're presenting. It's definitely not a subject you want any miscommunication on.

I just asked my own co-teacher what they thought, they looked surprised/stunned asked "why?" and shook their head. Please don't do this. Your heart is in the right place, but English class in a Korean rural middle school is not the place to go social justice warrior..especially about anything sexual. Frankly speaking, you have no idea how to teach this subject to a bunch of middle schoolers that come from a different culture and aren't fluent in English.

They are going to do what is normal in Korea--a foreigner trying to teach them something that doesn't align with that will just be a waste of time. This is something that I Korean has to do. Yeah, i agree. They are definitely going to tell you no, and if they don't, it's because they don't understand exactly what you want to do.

Bringing this up is just going to make you look like a weirdo. I don't want to bad talk people here, but posts like this honestly do worry me. Take this in the spirit it's intended, but I have to question the common sense of someone that would think teaching lessons about sex and consent to middle school students in a foreign language is a good idea. While I see that your heart is in the right place your brain isn't.

If you do want to teach something that helps them, teach a self-defense English class. Even that I wouldn't do because the abuses that will be unleashed, but Koreans can at least not be 100% against it. Don't even mention the word sex! This class will be to defend themselves from people that are bigger than them that wants to hurt them, but again, I am highly not recommending this.

I am just wondering why you think it would be a good idea to teach this, as a foreigner, to middle school students, in the country, in a religiously conservative country? This is something for college or possibly, stress on the possibly, for a girl's high school.

Just a heads up, kill this, erase the lesson plan, and don't mention it again. I am sure that if you mention this to your CT they will wonder who the heck they hired and either not renew your contract or try and get you fired because of how bizarre and inappropriate this is for the age group you are teaching, especially for a person in your position.

While I see that your heart is in the right place your brain isn't. If you do want to teach something that helps them, teach a self-defense English class. Even that I wouldn't do because the abuses that will be unleashed, but Koreans can at least not be 100% against it.

Don't even mention the word sex! This class will be to defend themselves from people that are bigger than them that wants to hurt them, but again, I am highly not recommending this. I am just wondering why you think it would be a good idea to teach this, as a foreigner, to middle school students, in the country, in a religiously conservative country?

This is something for college or possibly, stress on the possibly, for a girl's high school. Just a heads up, kill this, erase the lesson plan, and don't mention it again.

I am sure that if you mention this to your CT they will wonder who the heck they hired and either not renew your contract or try and get you fired because of how bizarre and inappropriate this is for the age group you are teaching, especially for a person in your position. Do you even know what is allowed to be taught in Korea? In England only the biological aspects of sexual reproduction are mandatory, and other issues such as consent, contracption and emotions are to be taught at the discretion of the school.

Parents have the right to withdraw their children (after being notified in advance) from lessons covering anything non-biological. Religious schools (catholic especially) can use religion as a reason to ignore certain aspects altogether; as most contraception is banned by the church, they feel there is no point metioning it. Unless you know both the government's and your school's stance on ALL aspects of the issue, do not touch this with a 10 foot pole.

Okay, first off, I'm in a metropolitan city, not a rural school. It was my Korean boyfriend and my Korean co-teacher/close friend who first suggested teaching this topic to me. Obviously I want to keep it age appropriate, but there is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching teenagers that they should respect other people's bodies. My boyfriend told me that, while serving in the Korean military, he'd hear people bragging about getting girls drunk and raping them.

I'd hope that if kids are brought into a conversation about not being entitled to others' bodies early enough, there's more accountability that that kind of scenario is a crime and can't be brushed under the rug. I think it's important to talk to kids about how your body is your body and you deserve control over it to students--that concept seems very important and not at all shocking.

My co-teachers have been awesome, and have loved it when I've taught about racism, anti-smoking, etc. I'm not going to go into explicit details about sex obviously; I wasn't even going to use the word. Korea isn't as conservative as a lot of western countries seem to think it is. My boyfriend told me that his health teacher in middle school talked about his former exploits with prostitutes and warned the kids to stay away from unprotected sex.

Maybe my school is just different than other schools, but I think teaching kids that they should respect the personal space of others isn't a huge shocker. I've been here almost 2 years and have had absolutely zero complaints.

My co-teachers have praised me for talking about real issues with my students. The pushback isn't really about whether or not the students should hear this information, it's about WHO should deliver the message. Sexual conduct/body protection isn't a topic for a middle school English class done by the school's foreign teacher. That's a topic that should be discussed in the native language with a person trained to talk about it.

It's a sensitive thing that shouldn't get bungled by language deficiencies. There are also cultural points to consider. What is and isn't appropriate isn't always the same in Korea and the West. They stick their fingers up each others buttholes as a joke here for jokes, hold hands and sit on each others laps, among other things. Topics like racism and anti smoking are a lot more black and white and easier to talk about, but something like this should be done by a native professional.

This has to be a troll post, but let's assume it isn't. You're and English teacher, and you're there to teach English. Don't pick some other topic that's interesting to you and sneak it into your English class. If your English lesson is going to have a theme, choose circumstantial themes (at school, at the store, with your friends, with your family).

Even if there's not a lot of teaching on this (assuming that's appropriate in a middle school academic environment), it shouldn't be taught in English class--especially since you're goal seems to be teaching about the topic rather than the English of the topic.

Okay, first off, I'm in a metropolitan city, not a rural school. It was my Korean boyfriend and my Korean co-teacher/close friend who first suggested teaching this topic to me. Obviously I want to keep it age appropriate, but there is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching teenagers that they should respect other people's bodies. My boyfriend told me that, while serving in the Korean military, he'd hear people bragging about getting girls drunk and raping them.

I'd hope that if kids are brought into a conversation about not being entitled to others' bodies early enough, there's more accountability that that kind of scenario is a crime and can't be brushed under the rug.

I think it's important to talk to kids about how your body is your body and you deserve control over it to students--that concept seems very important and not at all shocking. My co-teachers have been awesome, and have loved it when I've taught about racism, anti-smoking, etc. I'm not going to go into explicit details about sex obviously; I wasn't even going to use the word. Korea isn't as conservative as a lot of western countries seem to think it is.

My boyfriend told me that his health teacher in middle school talked about his former exploits with prostitutes and warned the kids to stay away from unprotected sex. Maybe my school is just different than other schools, but I think teaching kids that they should respect the personal space of others isn't a huge shocker.

I've been here almost 2 years and have had absolutely zero complaints. My co-teachers have praised me for talking about real issues with my students. You're off your rocker. Imagine if your high school Spanish or French teacher decided to teach a lesson on bodily consent and sexual activities when you (presumably) barely speak the language. Middle schoolers have enough trouble holding basic conversations and debating simple topics like "Should we wear school uniforms" in English, let alone understanding something as culturally nuanced as consent.

And yes, Western concepts of bodily autonomy and consent are not universally applicable to Korea, and you'll without a doubt be unable to properly elucidate the particular nuances without possibly running afoul of cultural norms that you aren't trained to deal with. Leave this lesson on Tumblr and don't try to do anything but teach English. In my classes, I teach that racism and sexism is bad IF and only IF it is brought up in the class organically, at which point I'll do my best to address the topic and deal with it then.

But I don't plan a lesson on a controversial subject (yes, this is controversial) that challenges some of the very basic cultural norms of my host society in an effort to educate my students on Western ideals.

Deal with it in the context of English if it comes up, and leave it at that. This is TOTALLY inappropriate for a middle school EFL class and as others pointed out the topic is also most likely over their heads from a language standpoint as well.

File this under "what were you thinking" and move on to something they'll actually have fun with. I totally agree that at some point they should learn these things from someone, but their English native English teacher is absolutely not the person who should be doing that.

While I agree that this is not a subject I would touch with a ten foot pole... I think if OP is going to do it anyway, here's a suggestion: Come up with some innocent role plays and stick with basic dialog like "No, don't touch me." "Stop. I don't like that." "Please call me a taxi." "I want to go home." For example, two boys are horsing around, hitting each other, joking around.

One boy hits too hard, and the other says "Stop. I don't like that." Then stress that the other person MUST STOP IMMEDIATELY. Example 2, two girls are traveling abroad. One gets tired and says "I want to go home" while the other one asks a passerby to "Please call a taxi." Innocent, and good for many situations.

I think it is appropriate in our position as GET's to teach proper behavior, and even in elementary something as mentioned above is important for students to learn. Teach about safety, teach about proper behavior. Basically, teach them to respect the desires and opinions of others without bringing up sex, etc. If you teach with a coteacher, perhaps he or she could take it that step further and mention how the language learned can help protect one from weirdos and creeps too. And perhaps even more importantly than the language used, watch how your students interact with each other on a daily basis.

If you see that students aren't respecting their friends, step up and say something then. Tell your co-teachers and students why it is important that they STOP. Perhaps then OP can subtly make a difference in the lives of her(?) students. While I agree that this is not a subject I would touch with a ten foot pole... I think if OP is going to do it anyway, here's a suggestion: Come up with some innocent role plays and stick with basic dialog like "No, don't touch me." "Stop. I don't like that." "Please call me a taxi." "I want to go home." For example, two boys are horsing around, hitting each other, joking around.

One boy hits too hard, and the other says "Stop. I don't like that." Then stress that the other person MUST STOP IMMEDIATELY. Example 2, two girls are traveling abroad. One gets tired and says "I want to go home" while the other one asks a passerby to "Please call a taxi." Innocent, and good for many situations.

I think it is appropriate in our position as GET's to teach proper behavior, and even in elementary something as mentioned above is important for students to learn. Teach about safety, teach about proper behavior. Basically, teach them to respect the desires and opinions of others without bringing up sex, etc. If you teach with a coteacher, perhaps he or she could take it that step further and mention how the language learned can help protect one from weirdos and creeps too.

And perhaps even more importantly than the language used, watch how your students interact with each other on a daily basis. If you see that students aren't respecting their friends, step up and say something then.

Tell your co-teachers and students why it is important that they STOP. Perhaps then OP can subtly make a difference in the lives of her(?) students. I think these more innocent role play ideas are a great idea! I agree that you should not bring up the subject of sex and consent as an entire lesson, although I really commend you on addressing other important issues such as racism.

But this one could really go the wrong way, and I think the most important thing will be how difficult it will be to have them understand this in a completely different language. I myself have talked about safety and stuff WHEN IT CAME UP IN CLASS. For example, there was a section in the book (for my middle schoolers) about internet dating, and I just kinda stressed to them that you can't really know who is on the other side of the connection so they should be careful.

I also (I kid you not) had a class of middle school girls (just girls) I am quite close with and one said something about "Coke". It came out TOTALLY WRONG (I think you know what I mean), and so I basically told her that sounds like a bad word and told her to enunciate it correctly (finally I gave up and told her to just say Cola haha), and we all had a good laugh.

But that was still a bit of a risk, because if it had rubbed one student/parent the wrong way, I'm sure someone would have jumped down my throat. Just be careful. No one wants you to cross any cultural boundaries and get in any kind of trouble, even if you're coming from a good place. Honestly, I wouldn't do a lesson on this topic. I AGREE WITH YOU THAT THESE STUDENTS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THIS STUFF, but it would be difficult and a bit inappropriate to talk about unless it was a high level, special class- such as 'English and Social Issues for Adults'.

But if you must, I like the ideads janelle_j threw out there! Good luck and I know some people are coming off a bit harsh, but I think everyone feels your heart is in the right place; this just,well, is not the time or the place, haha. While I agree that this is not a subject I would touch with a ten foot pole...

I think if OP is going to do it anyway, here's a suggestion: Come up with some innocent role plays and stick with basic dialog like "No, don't touch me." "Stop. I don't like that." "Please call me a taxi." "I want to go home." For example, two boys are horsing around, hitting each other, joking around. One boy hits too hard, and the other says "Stop. I don't like that." Then stress that the other person MUST STOP IMMEDIATELY.

Example 2, two girls are traveling abroad. One gets tired and says "I want to go home" while the other one asks a passerby to "Please call a taxi." Innocent, and good for many situations.

I think it is appropriate in our position as GET's to teach proper behavior, and even in elementary something as mentioned above is important for students to learn. Teach about safety, teach about proper behavior. Basically, teach them to respect the desires and opinions of others without bringing up sex, etc.

If you teach with a coteacher, perhaps he or she could take it that step further and mention how the language learned can help protect one from weirdos and creeps too. And perhaps even more importantly than the language used, watch how your students interact with each other on a daily basis. If you see that students aren't respecting their friends, step up and say something then. Tell your co-teachers and students why it is important that they STOP. Perhaps then OP can subtly make a difference in the lives of her(?) students.


best dating abuse lesson plans

best dating abuse lesson plans - Lesson Plan and Activity Finder


best dating abuse lesson plans

If you're an ESL teacher looking for fun activities for talking about dating, look no further. Below are over thirty questions and activities to get your ESL students talking, reading and writing about dating. Although ESL students tend to absolutely love just sitting around talking with a group about romance and dating, there are plenty more fun activities you can do that involve reading writing, playing games, listening to music and watching videos as well as having .

Discussing Dating Split your students up into groups of 3-5 to discuss the following questions: • How does dating work in your country? • How do you decide whom to date? Where do you meet people to date?

• How do you begin dating? • Who asks whom? • Who pays? • What topics do you think are acceptable to discuss on a first date? • What kinds of things do you do on a date? • Describe a typical first date in your culture. • How does dating change the longer you date? • How serious is dating in your culture? If you date, does it mean you're probably going to get married, or is it often just for fun?

• How long do people in your country usually date before they get married? • Do you spend time alone with your date, or are there other people there? Does this change over time? • How long do you think you should date before you start holding hands, kissing, etc.? • Do people in your country use online date matching services?

• Do people in your country go on ? • If you are single, would you go on a blind date? If you aren't single, would you have gone on a blind date when you were single? Who would you trust to set you up on a blind date? Writing About Dating Here are some writing activities that, unless otherwise noted, are great for groups, pairs or individuals. • Tell a story - Imagine two people from very different cultures are going out on a first date.

What kinds of problems might they have? Write a story about them and their date. • Develop an online dating profile - Work in a group. Make an online dating profile for one of your group members (or an imaginary person). Make him/her sound interesting. • Write an email - Read the profile created by another group and write an email to that person, introducing yourself. • Write a letter - Think of a problem someone might have with their boyfriend or girlfriend.

Write a letter to an advice columnist asking for advice. Trade letters with a classmate and write an advice letter back to them. • Review a letter - Edit a poorly written introduction email. Reading About Dating Look in the local paper to find five fun things to do on a date.

Gather a group of books that contain stories about dating, romance and/or marriage that students love to read. Read and discuss any article you think your class would find interesting and appropriate from a dating advice site like .

ESL Games for Talking About Dating • Students sit in a circle. Student A writes a sentence about a character on a date and passes the paper to Student B. Student B draws a picture of the scene described by Student A, then folds down the paper so that Student A's sentence is hidden. Student C looks at the picture drawn by Student B and writes a sentence about what he/she thinks is happening. Student C then folds down the paper so that Student B's picture and Student A's sentence are hidden.

Student D reads Student C's sentence and draws a picture of it. This continues, alternating pictures and sentences with only the previous student's work visible to the current student, until the paper gets back to Student A.

Then you can unfold the paper and see the hilarious progression from the original sentence and picture to the final. Everyone can play this at once if every student starts by writing a sentence on his/her own sheet of paper. All the papers travel around the circle at the same time, and you end up with lots of funny stories and drawings.

• Spin the Bottle. It is not a good idea to actually play the game; but, you could teach your students about Spin the Bottle and other kissing games played by American teenagers at parties.

• The Dating Game - Just like the old TV show, split students up into groups of four with one person seeking a date and the other three being potential dates.

They can all play themselves, they can create characters to play, or you can create the characters for them. • MadLibs - Write a few simple stories about dating or people on a date or someone who wants to go out with someone else, take out a few nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs, and let the students fill in the blanks blindly. Then read the nonsense and laugh. Advanced students can then write their own stories, identify and remove their own nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs, and then play the game with a partner.

Other Fun ESL Activities for Talking About Dating • Listen to Brad Paisley's song, "Me Neither." Hand out the lyrics with words missing and make it into a cloze listening exercise, change some of the words to similar-sounding (but incorrect) words and have your students correct the mistakes, or have your students act out the story. • Have students work in pairs facing each other, one facing a TV and the other with his or her back to it.

Play a date scene from a movie on mute (, and have good ones). The student who can see the TV describes what's happening to the student who can't see it. More Resources Online • has some great ideas and resources for talking about friendship, romance, dating, love, marriage and Valentine's Day.

• has a lesson plan on dating that comes in two difficulty levels. • Check out YourDictionary's . Dating is one of the most fun topics to discuss in an ESL classroom.

The students love it, which makes it a lot of fun to teach, and while they're talking about romance and fun nights out on the town, they're also learning and reinforcing all kinds of grammatical structures, vocabulary and idioms. What more could you ask for? MLA Style "ESL Fun Activities For Talking About Dating." YourDictionary, n.d. Web. 20 December 2018. . APA Style ESL Fun Activities For Talking About Dating. (n.d.).

Retrieved December 20th, 2018, from https://esl.yourdictionary.com/lesson-plans/esl-fun-activities-for-talking-about-dating.html


best dating abuse lesson plans

By the end of these lessons, students will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the sexual pressures among teen youth. 2. Create personal approaches to questions addressing sexual behavior. 3. Practice skills in speaking and listening as tools for learning. 4. Apply basic skills of logic and reasoning. • Paper, pens, pencils • • • Access to research materials 1. Middle School is a tough time for kids sexually. By the sixth grade they are beginning to explore their own sexuality and sexual identity.

They are often confused by and unprepared for a society filled with sexual messages, pressures and dangers: • They feel pressure to laugh at sex jokes even though they are embarrassed by them. • Television glorifies sex, but middle schoolers are still a little scared by it. • They may not want to engage in the latest "booty dancing" craze at the next school dance ?

but they feel pressure from their friends. • Boys pop girls' bra straps in the hall. Girls aren't sure whether to be glad someone is flirting with them or whether to be offended. • In cyberspace, kids can access pornographic sites or flirt with virtual "friends" on the Internet. Where do middle schoolers draw the line? How do they develop a healthy respect for their own sexuality and the sexuality of others? What is appropriate? How do they say no to pressure?

When are they in danger? What are the boundaries? Sexual Pressures teaches kids how to establish boundaries, respect themselves, and respect others in a world filled with sexual messages, pressures and dangers that are sometimes confusing and difficult to navigate.

For the introductory overview of this lesson click on play to view Sexual Pressures: () Explain to your students that the purpose of this exercise is to help kids face these issues and begin a dialogue with their parents. They will look at how they want their parents to talk to them about sex? This is a chance for them to set the rules on what is talked about and how. This assignment particularly looks at how issues such as personal behavior and emotions are addressed. Talking about the moral issues around sex are probably some of the hardest for young people, as well as their parents, to address.

Students can begin to learn how to face sexual pressures through opening the dialogue. 2. Formulating Questions and Answers • Students will divide into groups of 4 to 5 students. • Students should be directed to begin mini discussions addressing sex and morality issues such as a person's emotions, temptations and behavior.

Their task is to record key questions that are derived from these discussions. Students should have at least 8 to 10 questions to present to the class. Sample Questions: What is the difference between love and sex? What are some ways to express love without sex? What are some things to think about before you decide to have sex? What are some feelings someone might feel after having sex?

How do you deal with peer pressures? What are some things that might tempt someone to consider having sex? Does dancing promote sex? Does dress promote sex? What do you think is sexual harassment? What is date rape? Note: Some questions may include topics like taking sexual precautions (contraceptives), sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy and parenthood. Although these types of questions are important to touch on, they are not what this assignment is about.

Students need to focus on the emotional impact of sex and the types of temptations that are out there. • The next step is for the groups to formulate and record answers to the questions they have developed.

The students' questions will most likely have been answered according to their feelings. If access to research materials is available, have the students also research answers to the questions to validate the ones they have written. • Finally, while working in their groups, students can define the key vocabulary words addressing the topics around sex. See attached copy of the teacher's version with definitions.

Use the attached handout Sexual Pressures Key Words as the student worksheet for the vocabulary exercise. 3. Role Play -"Parent Talk" • Each group will choose two to three students from their group to role-play a "parent talk" about sex. One to two students will play the "parent(s)" and the other the "child". • The students will then role-play a parent/child "talk" about sex by using the questions their group discussed. This "talk" can take the approach of the child asking the parent questions or parent to child.

Students should try to play both scenarios. It will be important that this talk is looked upon as somewhat serious. What we want students to learn from this exercise is how they would like their parents to address and respond to questions about sex.

• After each role-play activity, have the rest of the class discuss only what was effectiveabout the "talk" they just experienced. Do not allow students to give negative feedback or critique role-play activities. These "effective" points might be the way a question was asked or answered, body language or approach used. Write these points on the board. After all of the groups have had a chance to perform, go over the points you have written down with the class. Have them write these points down for their personal notes.

• Suggest to your students that they use the list of questions and the key points to help them discuss the issues of sex with their parents. Groups of younger students may focus on three key questions that relate to sex and the morality issues around sex. These questions can derive from class discussion.

After groups have come up with supported answers to these questions, they can then choose to role-play their "parent talks" expressing the group's findings. With some class discussion, sum up effective "parent talk" tactics used. Have older students take this assignment to a different level.

Those students who did not get to role-play the "parent talk" will now role-play a "student to student" talk. One student will take the role of sharing information with their peer and the other receiving that information.

Students will learn how this talk is different from the "parent talk." 1. How do you want parents to address sex issues with you? 2. How is talking about sex with your parents different from talking about sex with your friends? 3. What do you think it means to be sexually responsible? 4. Is being sexually responsible cool or not cool?

5. Why do some teens have sex? Students may be evaluated by using the following three-point rubric: • Three points: student has followed all given instructions with full participation in group and class discussions. Students have thoroughly completed their group work and presented role-play scenario to the class.

• Two points: student has had some participation in group and class activities. They have completed group work and have participated in role-play activity. • One point: student has completed portions of the assignment with limited group and class involvement. "Sexual Pressures" (PSA Campaign) Working in small groups, students can develop a Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign addressing teen sex issues.

These PSAs should focus on the emotional impact of sex and the peer pressures and temptations kids face. Students should make a visual of their PSA, such as, a poster with slogan, pamphlet, TV advertisement, etc. The groups should create a message that is directed to a teen audience. Groups can then share their PSA campaigns with the class through oral presentation or have groups hang or post their PSAs around the room allowing the other students to see their work and their message.

Sex Statistics Breaking into small groups, have students work on specific topics (one topic per group) such as sexually transmitted diseases, contraceptives, abstinence, teen pregnancy/parenthood, sexual harassment and any other related sex issues. Through their research, have each group develop a "sex statistics" sheet concentrating on their topic. Using their creativity and imagination, students will then write these "sex statistics" in a handout form for distribution for the rest of the class.

They need to keep in mind that, although these are factual statistics, they need to catch the reader's interest and attention. "Sexual Bullying: Gender Conflict and Pupil Culture in Secondary Schools" Neil Duncan, September 1999 Sexual Bullying: Gender Conflict in Pupil Culture draws together a number of theories on gender, adolescent behavior and schooling to examine the social processes at work in four comprehensive schools. "Like It Is: A Teen Sex Guide" E.

James Lieberman, Karen Lieberman Troccoli, September 1998 This book is an intelligent and candid sex guide for teens. It provides information about contraceptives, as well as offering ideas for discussion and curriculum for educators and parents. It also includes an appendix for those seeking additional information on birth control. "What Parents Need to Know About Dating Violence: Learning the Facts and Helping Your Teen" Barrie Levy, Patricia Griggans, June 1995 This book offers information, advice, and real-life stories from parents and teens.

It is a guide to dealing with dating violence; and it discusses how to teach teens to protect themselves and build healthy relationships, describes resources available, and addresses special situations.

"Sex Is More Than A Plumbing Lesson: A Parents' Guide to Sexuality Education for Infants Trough the Teen Years" Patty Stark, December 1990 This book was written to assist parents who want to teach their kids about human sexuality but who aren't sure how to go about it, and who want some help addressing issues such as helping kids feel good about their bodies, helping kids postpone risky sexual behaviors, creating atmospheres where sex is easily discussed, and more.

"The Big Talk: Talking to Your Teen About Sex and Dating" Laurie Langford, October 1998 The unique thing about Ms. Langford's approach is that she writes from her own childhood memories?from the perspective of what she wishes she'd been told by her parents.

This makes her words powerful-especially for parents of teenagers. "Kids Still Having Kids: Talking About Teen Pregnancy" Janet Bode, Stanley Mack, Ida Marx Blue Spruce, May 1999), Young Adult This book provides a valuable resource for young adults making decisions about pregnancy, as well as those researching the issue for school projects.

This completely updated book contains interviews with pregnant teens, boyfriends' families, health-care workers, and counselors. A lively design, which includes cartoon strips and snippets from current newspaper and magazine articles, adds to the dynamic presentation. "No Apologies: The Truth About Life, Love & Sex" August, 1999, Young Adult Teens get the facts about sex in No Apologies: The Truth about Life, Love and Sex , an exciting book that highlights abstinence as the only true safe sex.

With gripping testimonies from real people, teens discover how others have been affected by choices of premarital sex and abstinence. "It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health" Robie H. Harris, Michael Emberley, February 1996, Ages 9-12 It's Perfectly Normal is well-presented and clear for the young reader. It is broken into easily-understood sections with numerous captions and illustrations that allow even those less skillful readers to understand the most important information.

Founded in 1914, the American Social Health Association is a nonprofit organization dedicated to stopping sexually transmitted diseases and their harmful consequences to individuals, families and communities. In 1994, Monroe County launched Not Me, Not Now, a multifaceted abstinence-only campaign to reduce the teen pregnancy rate in Monroe County. An advertising campaign serves as the centerpiece of Not Me, Not Now. The campaign, which features children, communicates the consequences of teenage pregnancy and motivates teens to remain abstinent.

As part of the American Social Health Association (ASHA), the iwannaknow.org Web site is designed specifically for teenagers with the purpose to provide a safe educational and fun place for teenagers to learn about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and their sexual health. The ASDA is a nonprofit organization whose mission for more than eight decades has been to stop sexually transmitted diseases and their harmful consequences to individuals, families and communities.

Children Now is a nonpartisan, independent voice for children, working to translate the nation's commitment to children and families into action. Children Now uses research and mass communications to make the well being of children a top priority across the nation.

Publishers of the booklet "Talking With Kids About Tough Issues." Talking With Kids About Tough Issues is a National initiative by Children Nowand the Kaiser Family Foundationto encourage parents to talk with their children earlier and more often about tough issues like sex, HIV/AIDS, violence, alcohol, and drug abuse. Click on any of the vocabulary words below to hear them pronounced and used in a sentence. Definition: an intense emotional attachment Context: A feeling of intense desire and attraction toward a person with whom one is disposed to make a pair; the emotion of sex and romance.

A deep, tender, ineffable feeling of affection and solicitude toward a person, such as that arising from kinship, recognition of attraction qualities, or a sense of underlying oneness. Definition: The property or quality by which organisms are classified as female or male on the basis of their reproductive organs and functions.

Females or males considered as a group. Context: The sexual urge or instinct as it manifests itself in behavior ? activities associated with sexual intercourse. Definition: to annoy or make fun of someone persistently Context: To arouse hope, desire, or curiosity in without affording satisfaction.

A preliminary remark or act intended to whet the curiosity. Definition: to make playfully romantic or sexual overtures Context: Flirting is a playful behavior intended to arouse sexual interest. Definition: the act of tempting or the condition of being tempted Context: The desire to have or do something that you know you should avoid.

Temptation is the act of influencing by exciting hope or desire. Definition: to irritate or torment persistently Context: Harassment is a feeling of intense annoyance caused by being tormented.

This tormenting is caused by continued persistent attacks and criticism. Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination, which violates the civil rights act of 1964. Definition: to force another person to submit to sex acts Context: Rape is the crime of forcing another person to submit to sex acts, especially intercourse. It is the act of seizing and carrying off by force (abduction) and/or abusive or improper treatment. Definition: the prevention of unwanted pregnancy Context: When using contraception, you are using a device, drug, or chemical agent that prevents conception Definition: A disease, such as genital herpes, gonorrhea, HIV or chlamydia, whose usual means of transmission is by sexual contact.

Context: Individuals can catch an STD only from an infected sexual partner. Therefore, the more partners they have, the greater their risk of coming in contact with an infected person. People should know that it is easy to contract during intimate sexual contact and STD's such as Gonorrhea and syphilis can be transmitted through oral sex. So, you do not need to be engaged in sexual intercourse to contract one.

Definition: a serious (often fatal) disease of the immune system transmitted through blood products especially by sexual contact or contaminated needles Context: A severe immunological disorder caused by the retrovirus HIV, resulting in a defect in cell-mediated immune response that is manifested by increases susceptibility to opportunistic infections and to certain rare cancers, especially Kaposi's sarcoma.

It is transmitted primarily by venereal routes or exposure to contaminated blood or blood products. Definition: of or relating to emotion Context: When someone is readily affected with or stirred by emotion. Arousing or intending to arouse the emotions of a person. Pertaining to, or characterized by, emotion; excitable; easily moved; sensational; as, an emotional nature Definition: concerned with the judgment of the goodness or badness of human action and character Context: Exhibiting goodness or correctness of character and behavior.

Morals are rules or habits of conduct, especially of sexual conduct, with reference to standards of right and wrong.

This lesson plan may be used to address the academic standards listed below. These standards are drawn from Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education: 2nd Edition and have been provided courtesy of thein Aurora, Colorado.

Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Language Arts Standard: Demonstrates competence in the general skill and strategies of the writing process Benchmarks: Prewriting: Uses a variety of prewriting strategies (e.g., making outlines, uses published pieces as writing models, constructs critical standards, brainstorms, builds background knowledge) Benchmark: Writes in response to literature (e.g., anticipates and answers a reader's questions, responds to significant issues in a log or journal, answers discussion questions, writes a summary of a book, describes an initial impression of a text, connects knowledge from a text with personal knowledge) Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Language Arts Standard: Demonstrates competence in speaking and listening as tools for learning Benchmarks: Plays a variety of roles in group discussions (e.g., active listener, discussion leader, facilitator) Benchmark: Asks questions to seek elaboration and clarification of ideas Benchmark: Listens in order to understand a speaker's topic, purpose, and perspective Benchmark: Conveys a clear main point when speaking to others and stays on the topic being discussed Benchmark: Presents simple prepared reports to the class Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Health Standard: Knows environmental and external factors that affect individual and community health Benchmarks: Understands how various messages from the media, technology, and other sources impact health practices (e.g., health fads, advertising, misconceptions about treatment and prevention options) Benchmark: Understands how peer relationships affect health (e.g., name calling, prejudice, exclusiveness, discrimination, risk-taking behaviors) Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Health Standard: Understands the relationship of family health to individual health Benchmarks: Knows how communication techniques can improve family life (e.g., talking openly and honestly with parents when problems arise Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Health Standard: Understands the functional concept of growth and development Benchmarks: Knows the similarities and differences between male and female sexuality Benchmark: Understands the processes of conception, prenatal development, and birth Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Life Skills (Thinking and Reasoning) Standard: Understands and applies the basic principles of presenting an argument Benchmarks: Makes basic distinctions between information that is based on fact and information that is based on opinion Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Life Skills (Thinking and Reasoning) Standard: Understands and applies basic principles of logic and reasoning Benchmarks: Understands that personal values influence the types of conclusions people make Grade level: 6-8 Subject area: Life Skills (Thinking and Reasoning) Standard: Applies decision-making techniques Benchmarks: Identifies situations in the community and in one's personal like in which a decision is required Benchmark: Secures factual information needed to evaluate alternatives Benchmark: Makes decisions based CWK Network Connecting with Kids provides television programming and products focused on the health, education, and well-being of children and young adults.

To contact CWK Network, write to Lee Scharback at lscharback@connectingwithkids.com.


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