Best dating comic strips of all times

best dating comic strips of all times

Which means that newspaper comic strips are dying as well. Online greats like xkcd , The Perry Bible Fellowship , and Achewood offer digital satisfaction, but how long will it be until you can no longer pick up a newspaper, leaf past the news, and arrive at the comics? Rather than sweat out how many days the world has left until Marmaduke is put to sleep and Cathy stops complaining, it's best to honor the the greatest cartoons to have ever been black and white and read all over (and the ones in color, too). These are the 25 Best Sunday Comic Strips of All Time There are precious few times in the strip's history that real people are mentioned, yet Watterson was able to make meaningful points about topics as varied philosophy, culture, and growing up.

best dating comic strips of all times

Let me begin by apologizing for what is most certainly a completely American culture dominated post that i doubt will have much relevance for my European readers. But who know… On to business! Using rigorous and exacting scientific testing I have determined, beyond all doubt, the 5 greatest comic strips to ever run in US newspapers. There is just no possibility of argument about this.

Well, except for well #2 should have been #1. And the fact that i’m leaving out Pogo, which is a renowned strip from the 60s, apparently full of great insights and political allegory. Unfortunately, when i’ve tried to read collections of Pogo they just didn’t hold much relevance for me and i’ve never really enjoyed it. So forget it. Let us begin. 5. Little Nemo In Slumberland (sorry folks, while i made sure that all the examples i chose are easily readable, there just simply are no online examples of Nemo that are legible.

However, the text is secondary. you can get the rough idea) Little Nemo is Slumberland was is weekly strip by Windsor McCay that ran from 1905 until about 1913. It was one of the first weekly comics ever, and 100 years later still shines far above its genre. In fact, i think because it predated its genre, it didn’t realize it was supposed to think more meagerly. This thing is the trippiest cartoon i’ve ever seen, and that includes almost every actual comic book ever made.

I mean look at the damn thing. It’s stunning. There IS an actual storyline, which took years to tell. See, Nemo is this little boy and obviously his parents give him absinthe or hemlock or something to put him to sleep because he dreams like a….. well, his dream are intense. Anyway, a messenger from King Morpheus appears to him and wants to bring him to Slumberland to play with the King’s daughter. The journey alone to Slumberland takes about a year to tell, and for awhile there’s a character, Flip, who wakes Nemo up every time he appears.

For that matter, in the last panel of every strip, Nemo awakes. The adventures go on and on and amongst the things McCay nails is the childhood blur between fantasy and reality. One tricky angle, however is a character called Imp, a black boy in a jungle outfit that is…. well….. uh…… racially insensitive to say the least. It was the early 1900s. People were racist as ****. There’s no point in glossing over the past, it’s been a long, racist, misogynistic, homophobic walk to the present.

And if you think things are all hunky dory now, you should ask a Tutsi in Rwanda how lovey dovey people are. Or ask a Southern Baptist to have some human decency towards a gay guy. Or a neo-con to…. alright you get the idea. So that’s the way it was. Still, the brilliance speaks for itself. The perspectives, the sense of scale… Let’s just see one more before we move along.

4. Bloom County If you were around in the 80s, there was simply NO strip better than Bloom County. I owned several of the collections, and in fact EVERYone KNEW owned several of the collections. It was one of those guaranteed things you could always find on the shelf of a Gen X-er. It was f-u-n-n-y. And it totally ripped on the cultural and political events of the time with razor sharp wit.

But the most important thing for me, that the level of humor rises far above the simplistic. It was clever and trippy, but the clincher is that it had fantastic characters. From Opus to Cutter John to Bill The Cat, the continuing storylines are where Bloom Country really shined.

(And which won’t translate in a few one-off samples.) 3. The Far Side Of all the comics mentioned here, The Far Side is hands down the funniest. And it is REALLY funny. Requires no cultural explanations, has no frills, it’s simple, to the point, and completely twisted.

Years later, they still crack me up. THIS is the strip and type of humor where one just thinks “WHERE does this guy come UP with this stuff?” No, i can’t stop. I’ve gotta post a few more: and one last one: 2. Calvin & Hobbes The very mention of the names causes immediate respect. You can drop these names and watch an entire room hush and slowly nod in respect and devotion. Many if fact, would take serious issue with its placement being not at number 1.

And admittedly, the strip has it all. It’s mind bendingly clever, it’s funny, it’s brilliantly insightful, it’s fantastically drawn, it’s tear jerkingly touching… it NAILS was being a kid was like. NAILS it. Calvin is EXACTly how i remember childhood. I lived in a perpetually fantasy overlay.

For awhile, everyone had at least one Calvin & Hobbes book on their shelf. It’s a shame, the great stuff, heck some of the best strips aren’t actually online, but this’ll have to do for now. And now, approaching fatherhood myself, this last one is coming up on me pretty fast: 1. Peanuts You knew it had to be Peanuts. Argue all you want, Calvin & Hobbes, Bloom County, almost every strip in existence that has insight, depth and hits moments where it far transcends the banality of the medium owes it ALL to Peanuts.

Peanuts set the standard and was the first to show a vision that extended far into a far off horizon. It debated Theology, (Charles Shultz the author was a devout Christian) it was sad, it talked on some pretty insightful levels, heck it gave me one of my favorite phrases EVER: “Don’t hassle me with your sighs, Chuck.” Sure the strip is dated, it’s heyday was the 60s and 70s. Sure the humor is been there done that, it set the STANDARD and has been repeated ever since.

To quote the great Arthur Miller: “Attention must be paid.” There was only ever one option for the #1 spot. Well, hasn’t this been fun! Hope you enjoyed the ride and see y’all soon.

Rather serendipitous. I’ve been re-reading my Peanuts Treasury lately. My all-time favorite Schultz strip (in text, since I can’t find it online)… (Linus, holding a candle, passes Charlie Brown in the dark) Linus: “They say it’s better to light a candle than to curse the darkness.” Charlie Brown: “Of course, there are those who would disagree…” Lucy: “YOU STUPID DARKNESS!!!” Remind you of anyone?


best dating comic strips of all times

best dating comic strips of all times - Best Dilbert Strips of All


best dating comic strips of all times

• • • • • • • • For 50 years, a round-headed boy in a yellow and black shirt and his loveable pet beagle brought smiles to the faces of millions of readers around the globe each day.

The world was introduced to Charlie Brown and the Peanuts gang on Oct. 2, 1950, when the first comic strip debuted in nine newspapers around the U.S.

Peanuts quickly became one of the most popular comic strips of all time and influenced movie, television, book and theater spin-offs.

Most people can relate in some way to the charismatic Peanuts characters and simple-yet-profound situations in which they find themselves. Here are the 10 most iconic Peanuts comic strips of all time. The First Strip—Oct. 2, 1950 Charlie Brown, Peanuts’ main character, is introduced for the first time, along with the characters of Shermy and Patty. Although he’s not yet wearing his iconic striped shirt, Charlie Brown’s round head and naive smile are instantly recognizable.

This is the first time he is called “Good Ol’ Charlie Brown,” a nickname that continues to haunt him throughout the strip. “Here Comes Snoopy”—Oct. 4, 1950 Snoopy, Charlie Brown’s pet beagle, appeared for the first time as an ownerless dog on the street. It was only later that Snoopy would be identified as Charlie Brown’s loyal sidekick, although he quickly became one of the most recognizable characters in the comic strip.

In Peanuts’ early years, Snoopy behaved like an average dog, his human characteristics evolving over time. “Football Gag”—Nov. 16, 1952 Every year without fail, Charlie Brown falls for the football gag when Lucy tells him that she’ll hold a football for him to kick. Although Charlie Brown does not trust Lucy at first, she persuades him to kick the ball, then pulls it away at the last second, just in time for him to fall to the ground.

Although Lucy made this prank famous, Violet was actually the first one to pull the ball away from Charlie Brown, not to spite him, but in fear that he would kick her hand. “Good Grief”—June 6, 1952 The first time Charlie Brown says, “good grief,” is in reaction to more of Lucy’s mischief—this time, it’s her misunderstood attempt to show him a large bug. This becomes Charlie Brown’s catchphrase and part of the worldwide Charlie Brown lexicon. “Snoopy Walks”—June 28, 1957 Snoopy did not walk on two legs for the first seven years of the comic strip, instead behaving like a normal dog and walking on all fours.

Snoopy’s transition to two legs completes his image as a partly human characters. Snoopy appears to be a dog who often forgets he’s a dog, instead walking, talking and interacting with others as if he’s a human.

“The Doctor Is In”—March 27, 1959 Lucy’s psychiatry booth is another running gag in the comic strip. Instead of running a lemonade stand, Lucy has a psychiatry business where other characters pay to tell her their problems. The price of her (generally unhelpful) advice normally runs at five cents.

Charlie Brown frequently visits Lucy’s booth where she answers in snarky quips like, “Snap out of it!” “The Great Pumpkin”—Oct. 26, 1959 The Great Pumpkin is an imaginary character created by Linus, who believes that on Halloween the Great Pumpkin rises from the pumpkin patch and delivers toys to good children around the world. Linus spends every Halloween waiting in a pumpkin patch for the Great Pumpkin while everyone else goes trick-or-treating, and he tries in vain to make the other characters believe in the Great Pumpkin.

The Great Pumpkin became a recurring feature of the comic strip and led to a popular television special, It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. “Snoopy Writes”—July 12, 1965 Snoopy often puts a large typewriter on the roof of his doghouse and writes under the pseudonym, “World Famous Author.” Each of his stories starts with the cliched phrase, “It was a dark and stormy night.” Despite his claims to be a world famous author, many of Snoopy’s stories remain unfinished and his work is often rejected by publishers.

“WWI Flying Ace”—Oct. 10 1965 Snoopy has many alter egos, the most famous of which is the World War I Flying Ace. As the Flying Ace, Snoopy holds imaginary battles with the Red Baron, using his doghouse as a biplane. Snoopy’s other alter egos include college student Joe Cool, a lawyer and impressions of various animals and Peanuts characters.

“Farewell”—Feb. 13, 2000 After 50 years, Schulz announced his retirement from Peanuts. This final Peanuts comic strip was published the day after Schultz’s death. Major characters and moments from the comic strips past appear in the final comic, surrounding Schultz’s letter to his readers and giving the comic strip a nostalgic and fitting farewell.


best dating comic strips of all times

• • • • • Which comic strip is the worst of all time? • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the by clicking the link above. You may have to before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

• Wambat is holding a weekly raffle giveaway of Steam games to promote the Fourth Age Total War mod and his Let's Play campaign! Check out the announcement thread .

• Peanuts • Garfield (the Heathcliff clone) • Marmaduke • Cathy • Curtis • Family Circus • Beetle Bailey • Mallard Fillmore • Doonesbury • Rose is Rose (is Boring) • Heathcliff (the Garfield clone) • Ziggy • Zippy the Pinhead (who?) • Fred Basset (who?) • Frank and Earnest (who?) • Bazooka Joe (wait...

I've heard of that) • That's Life (what?) • Judge Parker (huh?) I particularly hate Family Circus, because: 1. It isn't funny 2. It has no plot 3. It isn't drawn particularly well 4. It features only recycled material drawn differently, the same four themes over and over, I. The kids explaining things in "cutesy" words/ways, II. Death, church, praying, etc, III.

Billy's dotted-line adventures, IV. "Not Me" and "Ida Know" characters, 5. It has never once made me laugh, smile, or even think about how wonderful families and children are. Not even close.

6. It puts homocidal thoughts in my head and I consider myself a peace loving man. ...But if you can name a worse comic strip, please do so and explain why. "I'm going to die anyway, and therefore have nothing more to do except deliberately annoy Lemur." - Orb, in the chat "Lemur.

Even if he's innocent, he's a pain; so kill him." - Ignoramus "I'm going to need to collect all of the rants about the guilty lemur, and put them in a pretty box with ponies and pink bows. Then I'm going to sprinkle sparkly magic dust on the box, and kiss it." - Lemur Mafia: Promoting peace and love since June 2006 Check out the new poll question. (See above) Which comic strip is the absolute worst? Peanuts (don't kick the football, Charlie Brown.

Oh he missed. How funny) Garfield (used to be funny back in 1983. Leave the table and he eats your food.) Marmaduke (The dog is big. The dog is big. Funny.) Cathy (ACKKKKK!!!! I have to lose five pounds!!!!!! Wait.... was there supposed to be a punchline?) Curtis (token minority strip with appallingly bad writing) Family Circus (see rant in OP) Beetle Bailey (look!

Incompetent people in the 1950s US army... how funny) Mallard Fillmore (mmm... Right-wing BS. Where's the humor?) Doonesbury (mmm... Left-wing BS. Where's the humor?) Rose is Rose (is Boring. What the heck kind of name is Pasquale Gumbo?) Heathcliff (the Garfield clone) Ziggy (Like Charlie Brown... can't ever win. Gotcha) And some other wastes of space: Zippy the Pinhead (who?) Fred Basset (who?) Frank and Earnest (who?) Bazooka Joe (wait...

I've heard of that) That's Life (what?) Judge Parker (huh?) Ja Mata, Tosa. The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the Crown. It may be frail; its roof may shake; the wind may blow through it; the storm may enter; the rain may enter; but the King of England cannot enter – all his force dares not cross the threshold of the ruined tenement!

- William Pitt the Elder Umm, Family Circus is awful, but it inspired the Dysfunctional Family Circus parody, so it's now a priceless classic.

Actually I think they might have sued the DFC out of existence, but just the memory of it makes the real Family Circus worthwhile to me. If you never heard of the DFC, it was the most crass, black sort of humor you can imagine, which fit perfectly with the cheesy, cheery, absurdly perfect drawings.

I voted for Doonesbury, because there's nothing funny about milking the same political in joke for months on end. Oh God, so many difficult choices... I thought I had it pretty much down to Family Circus and Garfield, but then Peanuts pops into consideration. Now, I have nothing against the strip. It was very excellent, broke a lot of ground, today's cartoonists swear by Schulz as their idol, etc. But it all happened already. What cheeses me off is that my newspaper, and probably a lot of others, insist on re-running the strip going on nearly a decade after Schulz has passed.

Never mind that there are lots of good, more modern strips that are struggling to gain an audience for this exact reason, there are strips from 40 years ago that need to be re-printed. Yaaaaaay nostalgia! * takes meds, has a nap* "I'm going to die anyway, and therefore have nothing more to do except deliberately annoy Lemur." - Orb, in the chat "Lemur.

Even if he's innocent, he's a pain; so kill him." - Ignoramus "I'm going to need to collect all of the rants about the guilty lemur, and put them in a pretty box with ponies and pink bows.

Then I'm going to sprinkle sparkly magic dust on the box, and kiss it." - Lemur Mafia: Promoting peace and love since June 2006 I voted for all of them, because i hate all of those comic strips with a passion.

They're about as funny as spondylitis and brain cancer combined. Except Fred Basset. I've always had fond memories of Fred Basset due to the videotape i had of some of the animated shows when i was young.

It made me laugh. Until it wore out from being played too much. I agree that Family Circus has always sucked. Never understood why it was widely-circulated. Beetle Bailey has been lame for ages too. Cathy often irritates me, but every now and then a strip will make me chuckle. Never understood the appeal of Peanuts either, particularly in Schulz' later years. The entire strip seemed random and....schizophrenic, somehow. Never understood the appeal of Peanuts either, particularly in Schulz' later years.

The entire strip seemed random and....schizophrenic, somehow.Aw c'mon, Peanuts is fantastic. A boy and his dog and his friends. Of course the strip seemed random, life is random. And there were lots of great insights in Peanuts. Also, you have to see it for what it was. It wasn't an exercise in existentialist French thought, or neo-colonial post-modern vision of Liberace's inner struggle, it was a comic strip you could read to a five year-old.

For obvious reasons I can't link to any of the DFC archives, but for the Garfield haters there's an alternative that is, as far as I'm aware, entirely clean. Behold, one forum archive from the now defunct Garfield Randomizer, which was ungodly hilarious at times: The idea being that it cut each panel up individually and then remixed them at random, forcing your mind to try to find the connection.

There was a Fred Basset parody floating around out there too, which I couldn't link to here, but I never found it all that funny. Quite frankly all comic strips suck if you consider just how good some of their parodies are, and it's because of what's required to be a successful comic strip. You have to be bland enough that every single English reading human being could crawl out of bed on a Monday, drag themselves to the coffee pot, rub the sand out of their eyes and still not only not be offended by what you drew and wrote, but also understand it.

I mean, let's face it, Scott Adams is much funnier as a pocket philospher on his blog than in all the comic strips he ever wrote. The problem with many of these strips is that they have gone on way too long. There is only so much story a cartoonist can come up with, and only so far you can take the characters. This is why you have to admire guys like Larson (Far Side) and Watterson (Calvin and Hobbes), who quit before their strips got stale.

Berke Breathed has kept fresh by going Sunday-only with first Outland and now Opus. Gary Trudeau has been going for almost 40 years with Doonesbury, but it's political/current events, so new material is fairly easy to go with. Yes, a lot of it is heavily slanted left, but that's why many papers put it in the editorial pages, not the regular comics.

And while Trudeau gets slammed by right-wingers, he does a lot of work with injured vets (especially amputees), and gives to Fisher House. And then there is just plain garbage, like Cathy, Mary Worth, and Judge Parker. - now taking comments, corrections, suggestions, and submissions If I werent playing games Id be killing small animals at a higher rate than I am now - SFTS Si je n'étais pas jouer à des jeux que je serais mort de petits animaux à un taux plus élevé que je suis maintenant - Louis VI The Fat "Why do you hate the extremely limited Spartan version of freedom?" - Lemur Most of them are terrible.

Some of those Dutch ones are terrible too, especially the cheap ones that look really bad. There were a few people who thought a stupid comic like Scribbly (or whatever it's called) is funny...... take a good look at the word 'were' I used: it is the past as they are no more; they mysteriously perished Anyway, I don't get how people still like these bad comics made by some schmuck.

I mean... sure, sure, if you're the creator and it brings you some money, alright, but at least get better at what you do and make it really WORTH something. Those very small strips with a few simple lines drawn here and there and a terrible short plot are the worst. At the moment the only Dutch one I know of that was decent is De Stamgasten. I don't know if it's still okay today. There are comic strips I find very unfunny, but some of it has to do with being able to relate with the target audience.

Strips like Family Circus and Cathy have definite audiences. Single folks aren't going to get Family Circus and men will have a harder time with Cathy. I find Dilbert hysterical, but I wonder how funny it is to someone who hasn't worked in Cubicleland or in a technology field. Another point in defense of unfunny comics, is that I suspect it is harder than it looks.

Sit down and try to write a funny, 3 panel joke or story...six or seven days a week...on a deadline...for years on end. I don't think I'd want to do that. As for specific dislikes in comics, I hate cats, so I don't get Garfield. My all time least favourite comic used to be a strip called Nancy. Fortunately, I don't think it is made anymore. Nancy reminds me of what I'll call Gregoshi's Law of Comic Strips, but I've got to run right now, so you'll have to wait.

"I'm going to die anyway, and therefore have nothing more to do except deliberately annoy Lemur." - Orb, in the chat "Lemur. Even if he's innocent, he's a pain; so kill him." - Ignoramus "I'm going to need to collect all of the rants about the guilty lemur, and put them in a pretty box with ponies and pink bows. Then I'm going to sprinkle sparkly magic dust on the box, and kiss it." - Lemur Mafia: Promoting peace and love since June 2006 "I'm going to die anyway, and therefore have nothing more to do except deliberately annoy Lemur." - Orb, in the chat "Lemur.

Even if he's innocent, he's a pain; so kill him." - Ignoramus "I'm going to need to collect all of the rants about the guilty lemur, and put them in a pretty box with ponies and pink bows. Then I'm going to sprinkle sparkly magic dust on the box, and kiss it." - Lemur Mafia: Promoting peace and love since June 2006 Quick Navigation • Site Areas • • • • • • • Forums • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •


50+ Hilariously Funny Garfield Comics To Make You Laugh.
Best dating comic strips of all times Rating: 9,3/10 1242 reviews
Categories: best dating