Best dating navy officer sword

best dating navy officer sword

The sword is sponsored by the Britannia Association, the College Alumni, and also recognises the Cadet who improved the most during training. Sub Lieutenant (SLt) Abdulrahman Buniyamin presented with a ceremonial sword by General Sir Gordon Messenger, Royal Marines, Vice Chief of the Defence Staff SLt Buniyamin, who is currently serving on the Nigerian Navy ship Burutu, said: “I am very happy to receive this prize. I put in my best effort for every activity, be it assessed or not assessed. My knowledge has improved by being here, which has made me a better naval officer back at home.” BRNC is a modern military College steeped in traditional values.

best dating navy officer sword

WW1 / George V British Royal Navy Named Officer's Sword, For Sale In good condition, an early 20th Century British Royal Navy officer's sword, with folding guard engraved to "H A Bickford, RN".

Now with 20% discount. This is a good research project for somebody. The sword has post-Victorian Tudor Crown to the hilt and is etched to "Matthews & Co Outfitters Portsea" which, according to our reference books, means the sword was made in 1901 to 1903. But we could not find any mention of H A Bickford on the Royal Navy list until WW2, when he served as a civil naval technical officer with the rank of Commander within the Admiralty's navigation section. The fact he had the rank of commander and that this sword's blade etching dates from the reign of Edward 7th or possibly George 5th (with Edward 8th onwards, they put the monarch's personal royal cypher to the blade; this one has only the British Royal Coat of Arms), shows that H A Bickford must have had some history with the Royal Navy and quite likely served as an active officer during WW1, but we can not find him before WW2.

The 28 3/4 inch blade shows that Commander Bickford was a short man! Anyway, the blade is in overall very good condition but with some patina patches, and is firm in the hilt. The hilt is generally very good, the folding guard with "H A Bickford, RN" engraved to it, works well and locates properly onto the securing pin on the top locket of the scabbard.

The grip is a little grubby but overall very good, and the twisted grip wire bindings are also complete and good. The original sword knot is aged but good; the same with the scabbard. The sword sheathes and draws well.

A good sword with bags of research potential for only (was) £450, now £360. Please quote item reference K32. Further / full sized images available upon request. Box 1168-1m (1.921) (formerly ) - All rights reserved


best dating navy officer sword

best dating navy officer sword - Windlass Officers Swords


best dating navy officer sword

The Marine Corps noncommissioned officer's sword is a worn by (NCOs) and staff noncommissioned officers (SNCOs) of the . The NCO sword was adopted in 1859 and is patterned after the 's foot officers' sword of 1850. The M1859 NCO sword continues service today as the Marine Corps drill and ceremonial sword. The sword's use is restricted by regulation to ceremonial occasions by an NCO or Staff NCO in command of troops under arms or at weddings and wedding receptions where at least one of those being married is in uniform and has the rank of Corporal or higher.

USMC Model 1859 NCO Sword Type Place of origin United States Service history In service 1859–present Used by non-commissioned officers Wars Mid-19th and early-20th centuries Production history Designer Modeled on U.S. Army M1850 foot officers' sword Designed Introduced 1859, notable design changes 1875, 1918 Manufacturer Horstmann, Ames, various others Produced 1859–present No. built Undetermined Variants Unetched blades until 1875, wide blades until 1918 Specifications Length 34"-36" commonly Blade length 28"-30" commonly type Saber, slightly curved, single-edged with false edge type Cast-brass hilt, leather-wrapped grip / Black leather scabbard, two brass mounts, frog stud The sword is patterned after the 's foot officers' sword of 1850, with minor differences.

NCO swords initially were equipped with heavy, wide blades similar in shape and weight to those typically used on standard Army M1850 foot officers' swords. Unlike the Army officers' blades, however, the blades on old Marine NCO swords were polished bright but not etched.

The familiar etched designs on Marine NCO swords were authorized in 1875 regulations, and they have been a standard feature of Marine NCO swords ever since. Marine NCO swords feature a cast-brass with a half-basket ; leather-wrapped bound with twisted brass wire; a slightly curved, single-edged with a wide central and short false edge; and a black-leather with two brass mounts, including an upper mount with a stud for carrying in a leather belt frog, and a brass tip with drag.

U.S. Marine and NCOs have carried swords since the . During the earliest years, the swords worn by Marine NCOs are believed to have been based on patterns, though not necessarily the exact swords used by Army NCOs.

By approximately the mid-1820s, however, Marine NCOs began wearing distinctive short with brass eagle head hilts and curved blades. About this same time, in 1826, Marine Corps officers also began wearing a distinctive new sword of the , similar to those worn today. Five U.S. Marines with fixed . Their NCO displays his M1859 sword. , , April 1864. In 1859, a completely new sword pattern was introduced for Marine Corps officers, who were instructed to wear the same sword then worn by Army foot officers since 1850.

Also, in 1859 a similar sword was authorized for wear by Marine NCOs so that the swords worn by Marine officers and NCOs appeared to share very nearly the same pattern and characteristics. The Marine NCO version, though similar to that worn by Marine officers, had several differences.

Among the most noticeable, NCO swords had plain brass hilts and mounts, whereas officers' hilts and scabbard mounts normally were .

Also, the on NCO swords were wrapped with , whereas those for officers were usually covered with . Finally, NCO scabbards had only two scabbard mounts, consisting of a top mount with frog stud and a scabbard tip, whereas officers' scabbards bore three mounts, including upper and middle mounts fitted with carrying rings.

The sword worn by Marine NCOs since 1859 was also carried throughout the . With only slight modifications since that time, it has maintained its distinctive and traditional appearance. Even though the Navy Officer Sword is older (1852), it was discontinued until reauthorized during the 1900s.

The M1859 Marine NCO sword is the oldest weapon in continued (unbroken) service still in U.S. inventory. Marine using an NCO Sword with the . Model 1859 Marine NCO swords initially were equipped with heavy, wide blades similar in shape and weight to those typically used on standard Army M1850 foot officers' swords.

Unlike the Army officers' blades, however, the blades on early Marine NCO swords were polished bright but not . The familiar etched designs on Marine NCO swords were authorized in 1875 regulations, and they have been a standard feature of Marine NCO swords ever since.

That same year, in 1875, Marine officers once again were permitted to wear their traditional , which had been discontinued since 1859.

At some point after 1875, Marine Staff NCOs wore swords fitted with carrying rings, for attachment to sword belt slings, as opposed to traditional attachment by a stud in a sliding frog; this practice ceased during WWII and was not continued. The only subsequent change significantly affecting Marine NCO swords was in 1918, when uniform regulations specified that blade width be reduced to the narrow dimensions seen today.

• Draw sword • Present sword from carry or order sword • Order sword from present sword • Carry sword from order sword or present sword • Eyes right (left) from carry or order sword • Parade rest from order sword • At ease from any position of the sword • Rest from any position of the sword • Return to Attention • Return sword from carry or order sword The NCO sword continues service today as the Marine Corps drill and ceremonial sword.

In the Marine Corps the sword's use is restricted by regulation to ceremonial occasions by an NCO or Staff NCO in command of troops under arms. • LtCol (Ret.) Cureton, Charles H., USMC. "Early Marine Corps Swords," The Bulletin of the American Society of Arms Collectors, No. 93, 2006 • Crouch, Howard R. Historic American Swords. Fairfax, VA: SCS Publications, 1999 • Peterson, Harold L. The American Sword 1775-1945. Philadelphia: Ray Riling Arms Books Co., 1970, • "USMC Essential Subjects , Dept.

of Defense Legacy Resource Management Program, • Guidebook For Marines, Dept. of Defense Legacy Resource Management Program, • Simmons & Moskin, The Marines, 1998, , • NAVMC 2691, Marine Corps Drill and Ceremonies Manual, January 1999


best dating navy officer sword

WINDLASS SWORDS Our high quality military swords are manufactured using traditional methods, some dating back hundreds of years. At each stage of production, every Windlass sword undergoes quality checks by our team of inspectors to ensure that it meets all the requirements of the UK Ministry of Defence specifications. Windlass Sword is the only UK company that can supply every military sword pattern currently used by the British Armed Forces.

Our ISO 9001 accredited facility in India has, since 2008, been the sole supplier of swords purchased by the UK Ministry of Defence.Since that time our swords have been seen at all the big state occasions, including the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge,Trooping the Colour and State Opening of Parliament.

All our swords are made to MOD specs and manufactured from carbon steel. Laser etching done on site. Due to buying direct from manufacturers (only sword manufacturer in the world that produces own blades), you do not pay hundred's pounds extra more for a sword.


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