Best dating scamming format

best dating scamming format

The dating billing format is the simplest form of collecting money from your client in the Yahoo business. This is because they have become attached to you on an emotional level, and they can no longer say no on some certain requests. The basic truth is that you have to be smart if you decide to use the dating billing format. I will share my own story of how I used this yahoo format, and you will have a clear definition of how to use it. How I used the Dating Billing Format. Table of Contents. How I used the Dating Billing Format. How I Approached Her. My Next Billing Dating Format for Yahoo

best dating scamming format

*Names have been changed to protect identities She wrote him first. A short message sent on a Thursday evening in early December 2013, under the subject line: Match? You were listed as a 100% Match! I am not sure what a 100% match means … First, would you be interested in me.

Check my profile. Later, when she puzzled over their relationship, she'd remember this. She had contacted him, not the other way around. That had been a fateful move; it made everything easier for him.

But she didn't know that yet. So much of this was new. Amy* had never done this online-dating thing. It had been over two years since the death of her husband of 20 years; four, since she had lost her mother. Two sharp blows that had left her alone in her late 50s. The marriage had been troubled; he was abusive. His cancer took him swiftly, before she had time to process what was happening. After the , a grief counselor told her to make no sudden changes in her life for at least a year, and she followed that advice.

Now she was all by herself in a house secluded at the end of a long gravel driveway. In the summer, when the trees leafed out, you couldn't even see the road or the neighbors. Amy didn't feel isolated. She'd grown up here, in a conservative pocket of Virginia.

Her brothers and their families lived nearby. When it came to meeting new people, however, her choices were limited. Friends urged her to try online dating. And, reluctantly, she did. At first, she just tiptoed around the many dating sites, window-shopping in this peculiar new marketplace. The choices were overwhelming. It wasn't until the fall that Amy was ready to dive in. The holidays were coming, and she didn't want to face them alone. She signed up for a six-month subscription to Match.com, the largest and one of the oldest dating services on the Web.

She filled out a questionnaire and carefully crafted her profile. It would have been easy to burnish the truth, but she presented herself honestly, from her age (57) and hobbies ("dancing, rock collecting") to her financial status ("self sufficient").

The picture — outdoor photo, big smile — was real, and recent. And her pitch was straightforward: Looking for a life partner … successful, spiritually minded, intelligent, good sense of humor, enjoys dancing and travelling.

No games! In those first weeks, she exchanged messages and a few calls with men, and even met some for coffee or lunch. But nothing clicked — either they weren't her type or they weren't exactly who they said they were.

This seemed to be one of the problems with online dating. She resolved to be pickier, only contacting men who were closely matched — 90 percent or more, as determined by the algorithm pulling the strings behind her online search. She didn't really understand how it worked. Back in college, she'd studied computer science and psychology, and she considered herself pretty . She had a website for her business, was on Facebook, carried a smartphone.

But who knew exactly how these online dating services worked? Then she saw this guy, the one with a mysterious profile name — darkandsugarclue. The photo showed a trim, silver-haired man of 61 with a salt-and-pepper beard and Wayfarer-style shades. He liked bluegrass music and lived an hour away. And something else: He was a "100% match." Whoever he was, the computer had decided he was the one. More than a week went by with no answer. Then, this message appeared when she logged on to her account.

Hey you, How are you doing today? Thank you so much for the email and I am really sorry for the delay in reply, I don't come on here often, smiles ...

I really like your profile and I like what I have gotten to know about you so far. I would love to get to know you as you sound like a very interesting person plus you are beautiful.

Tell me more about you. In fact it would be my pleasure if you wrote me at my email as I hardly come on here often. He gave a Yahoo email address and a name, Duane. Some of the other men she'd met on Match had also quickly offered addresses, so Amy didn't sense anything unusual when she wrote back to the Yahoo address from her own account. Plus, when she went back to look at darkandsugarclue's profile, it had disappeared.

Your profile is no longer there — did you pull it? As I am recalling the information you shared intrigued me. I would like to know more about you. Please email me with information about yourself and pictures so I can get to know you better. Duane wrote right back, a long message that sketched a peripatetic life — he described himself as a "computer systems analyst" from North Hollywood, California, who grew up in Manchester, England, and had lived in Virginia for only five months.

But much of the note consisted of flirty jokes ("If I could be bottled I would be called 'eau de enigma' ") and a detailed imaginary description of their first meeting: It's 11 am when we arrive at the restaurant for brunch. The restaurant is a white painted weatherboard, simple but well-kept, set on the edge of a lake, separated from it by an expansive deck, dotted (not packed) with tables and comfortable chairs….

Amy was charmed — Duane was nothing like the local men she'd met so far. "You certainly have a great sense of humor and a way with words," she responded. And she was full of questions, about him and about online dating in general. "It is kind of a strange way to meet people," she wrote, "but it's not as cold as hanging around the produce department at the Kroger's." She also mentioned the deception she'd already encountered on previous dates — "lots of false advertising or 'bait and switch' folks," she wrote.

"It is amazing what people will do without conscience. I think it is always best to be whom we are and not mislead others." By December 17, they had exchanged eight more emails. Duane suggested they both fill out questionnaires listing not only their favorite foods and hobbies but also personality quirks and financial status.

He also sent her a link to a song, pop star Marc Anthony's "I Need You." "It holds a message in it," he told her, "a message that delivers the exact way i feel for you." Amy clicked on the link to the song, a torrid ballad that ends with the singer begging his lover to marry him. Then she rolled it back and listened to it again.

It's an ancient con. An impostor poses as a suitor, lures the victim into a romance, then loots his or her finances. In pre-digital times, romance scammers found their prey in the back pages of magazines, where fake personal ads snared vulnerable lonely hearts. But as financial crimes go, the love con was a rare breed, too time- and labor-intensive to carry out in large numbers.

It could take months or years of dedicated persuasion to pull off a single sting. That has changed. Technology has streamlined communication, given scammers powerful new tools of deceit and opened up a vast pool of potential victims. Web-based dating services first popped up in the mid-1990s and are now a $2 billion industry. As of December 2013, 1 in 10 American adults had used services such as Match.com, Plenty of Fish and eHarmony.

The mainstreaming of online dating is a revolution in progress, one that's blurring the boundaries between "real" and online . (AARP has joined this revolution, partnering with the online dating service HowAboutWe to launch AARP Dating in December 2012.) But the online-dating boom has also fueled an invisible epidemic. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), complaints about impostor ploys such as the romance scam more than doubled between 2013 and 2014.

The FBI says that Americans lost some $82 million to online-dating fraud in just the last six months of 2014. And that figure is probably low, because many victims never report the crime — or even tell their closest friends and family members that it occurred. Shame, fear of ridicule and the victim's own denial enforce this contract of silence. "Once people are invested in these, it's extremely difficult to convince them they are not dealing with a real person," says Steven Baker, director of the FTC's Midwest Region and a leading expert on fraud.

"People want to believe so bad." The power of the romance scam — its ability to operate undetected and to beguile its victim into a kind of partnership — lies here, in the gulf between what the victim believes and what is actually happening. Outside the scam, it's almost impossible to explain such irrational behavior. How on earth could you hand over your life savings to a stranger you met on the Internet, someone you've never even seen in real life? When Amy talks about how she fell in love, she always mentions his voice.

It was mesmerizing — musical, clipped, flecked with endearing Britishisms. His writing was like this, too — not just the British-style spellings of words such as "colour" and "favourite," but the way he dropped "sweetie" and "my dear" into every other sentence.

They exchanged numbers and began talking every day. His teenage years in Manchester explained the accent, but there was another sound in there, too, a wisp of something she couldn't place.

They spoke of the things you talk about at the beginning of a relationship — hopes, dreams, plans for the future. She opened up about her marriage, her grief, her work, her faith and her conviction that things happened for a reason. Amy had never met a man who was so passionately curious about her. And she was just as fascinated by Duane. Or was it Dwayne? In his early emails, the spelling seemed to switch. She found his LinkedIn profile — it was short, with just a few connections.

There were other curiosities. Amy felt they were in some kind of time warp. She would be fixing breakfast and he'd be talking about going out for the evening. He traveled a lot for his work, he said. Almost casually, he explained he was calling not from Virginia but from Malaysia, where he was finishing up a computer job.

Looking back, would things have been different if he'd said he was in Nigeria? Maybe. Amy knew all about those people who posed as Nigerian bankers and gulled victims with awkwardly phrased "business opportunities" over spam email. But this was different; Amy loved to travel and knew lots of people from overseas. The fact that Dwayne was living in Malaysia added an exotic note to his "eau de enigma." He talked about visiting Bali and sent her a link to an old John Denver song, "Shanghai Breezes," about two lovers separated by distance.

Funny how you sound as if you're right next door, when you're really half a world away. Enitan* lives in a small village outside Lagos, Nigeria. Born in neighboring Benin, he and his family moved to Nigeria during his childhood and went looking for opportunities in the emerging economic powerhouse of Africa's most populous nation. Instead, he found "the game" — Nigeria's shadow economy of 419 scams, named for the article in the Nigerian criminal code that deals with fraud.

Enitan is not the scammer Amy encountered in 2013; his fraud career ended in 2008, he says. Since he left scamming, he's spoken out against the practice. But based on his account, the fraud playbook he followed has not changed.

He estimates that over four years he made more than $800,000 from about 20 victims, both men and women. He agreed to talk on the condition that he would not be identified by name. "Once you are out of the game, you are seen as a traitor," he says. "You become the enemies of those who are in it." Typically, 419 scams are advance-fee frauds — variations of the age-old "Spanish prisoner" gambit, which promises riches to unsuspecting strangers in exchange for a modest payment.

Sent first as printed letters, then as faxes and emails purporting to be from Nigerian officials, these offers are now part of Internet lore. Indeed, they're so well known that 419ers have adopted a more effective variation — mining dating sites for targets of romance scams. Impostor scams can flourish wherever the Internet exists (Eastern Europe and Russia are also hot spots), but most dating fraud originates in Nigeria and Ghana, or in countries such as Malaysia and the U.K., which have large communities of West African expatriates.

In fast-developing parts of the world with high unemployment, a large percentage of English-speaking young men, and a postcolonial legacy of political instability and corruption, playing the 419 game can be a tempting way out. "Ignorance and desperation," Enitan says, drove him to fraud in 2004, when he was 18. That's when he drifted in with the legions of other young Nigerian men known as Yahoo Boys, named for their preference for free Yahoo.com email accounts.

He learned the con from an older mentor, and he, in turn, passed on his skills to younger friends. Enitan describes a three-stage model. Using stolen credit card numbers, the scammer would flood dating sites with fake profiles. Victims can be found anywhere — scammers also forage for connections on social media — but dating services provide the most fertile territory. Profile photos are pirated from social media or other dating sites.

To snare women, he'd pose as older men, financially secure and often in the military or in engineering professions. For male victims, he just needed a photo of an alluring younger woman: "Guys are easier to convince — they're a bit desperate for beautiful girls." The common thread between them: loneliness. All his victims, Enitan says, described themselves as divorced or widowed. "The lonely heart is a vulnerable heart." Ideally, the prospective victim makes the first move.

"It's always better if they respond to your ad first because that means they already like something about you," Enitan says. "If you respond first, you have a lot of convincing to do." Grooming the victim begins in the second stage.

After learning everything he can about his target, he would launch a campaign of love notes and gifts. "This is where you need lots of patience," he says. "This is where the real game is." Wow ... It feels like the universe is manifesting my perfect partner right before my very eyes.

Prayers answered and yes it does seem like we have known each other a long time.… Amy wrote that seven days after receiving the first message from Dwayne. They were on the phone for hours every day at this point. His was the first voice she heard in the morning, and the last before bed. Typically, Amy would talk and text with him until about 11 a.m., when she had to go to work.

Around 8 p.m., they'd talk again for an hour or two, then spend the rest of the evening texting or instant messaging into the night. In their emails, they filled pages with minutiae about their lives — her upcoming holiday trip to Sarasota, Florida, with a girlfriend; his visit to a textile museum in Kuala Lumpur.

Mixed amid this were Dwayne's increasingly ardent declarations of affection: Last night, in my dreams, I saw you on the pier. The wind was blowing through your hair, and your eyes held the fading sunlight.

Florid passages like that did not spring from Dwayne's imagination. He cribbed them from the Internet. Still, on Amy those words cast a powerful spell. That's how she thinks of it now — it was like a switch flicked in her head. She'd been in love before. But this was different, a kind of manic euphoria. "You are filling my days and nights with wonder," she confessed to Dwayne on Christmas Day.

Are you real? Will you appear someday.… Hold me in your arms, kiss my lips and caress me gently. Or are you just a beautiful, exotic dream … if you are … I don't want to wake up! At the core of every romance scam is the relationship itself, a fiction so improbable that most of us initially marvel in disbelief: How do you fall in love — really fall in love — with someone you never meet?

Until the term "catfishing" crept into the vernacular, love affairs with digital impostors were little-known phenomena. The term comes from the 2010 documentary film Catfish, about a man with a girlfriend who, we learn, does not exist; it later inspired an MTV series. Pretending to be someone else online is a social media parlor game among some young people.

But Amy had never seen the show or heard the term; she had no idea the practice was so common. In her 2008 book, Truth, Lies and Trust on the Internet, Monica Whitty, a psychologist at the University of Leicester in the U.K., explored the mechanics of online relationships. Computer-mediated relationships, she says, can be "hyperpersonal — more strong and intimate than physical relationships." Because the parties are spared the distractions of face-to-face interaction, they can control how they present themselves, creating idealized avatars that command more trust and closeness than their true selves.

"What happens is, you can see the written text and read it over and over again, and that makes it stronger," she says. Unsurprisingly, age is a factor: Not only are older victims more likely to lose larger sums of money, there's evidence that our ability to detect deception declines with age.

But when she surveyed scam victims in the U.K., Whitty found that certain personality types were particularly vulnerable. These people tended to describe themselves as romantics and risk takers, believers in fate and destiny. Many, like Amy, were survivors of abusive relationships. Women were actually slightly less likely to be scammed than men — but were far more likely to report and talk about it. The other term that Amy would later learn is "love bombing." The phrase was coined to describe the indoctrination practices of religious cults, but scam victims also apply it to the smothering displays of affection they receive from online suitors.

In both situations, the victim's defenses are broken down by exhaustion, social isolation and an overwhelming amount of attention. Amy would later describe the feeling as akin to being brainwashed. This is the painstaking grooming process that Enitan calls "taking the brain." The goal is to get the victim to transfer allegiance to the scammer.

"You want them thinking, 'My dreams are your dreams, my goals are your goals, and my financial interests are your financial interests,' " he says. "You can't ask for money until you have achieved this." When she came home from her trip to Florida over the holidays, Amy found a bouquet of flowers waiting for her, and a note: My life will never be the same since I met you.

Happy New Year. Love, Dwayne Not long after this, slightly less than a month since his first contact, Dwayne brought up his money troubles. He promised he'd fly home in January, as soon as he finished this job in Kuala Lumpur — a $2.5 million project.

But some components he purchased from Hong Kong were stuck in customs. He didn't need money, he assured her — he had a hefty trust fund in the U.K., and was in fact planning to retire after finishing this job. But he couldn't use his funds to cover the customs fees. And he couldn't come back to Virginia until he finished the job. He was stuck. So, if there was any way Amy could help him out, he'd pay her back when he returned to the States.

Photo illustration by Chris O'Riley When Amy asked for proof of his identity, Dwayne sent copies of his passport and financial documents. All were fake. Amy started by wiring $8,000 to someone in Alabama — a fiancée of a friend, Dwayne said — who'd then get the funds to him. Then he asked for $10,000 to bribe immigration officials because of an expired visa. Finally, Dwayne set a day for his flight home and emailed his itinerary.

He'd be there January 25. Amy even bought tickets for their first real date — a Latin dance concert in a nearby city that night. And she told her brothers and her friends that they would finally get to meet this mystery boyfriend. But first, another problem came up: He had to pay his workers. While he'd been paid $2.5 million for the project — he even emailed a scanned image of the check, issued by a Chinese bank — he couldn't open a bank account in Malaysia to access the funds.

She had the money. And Dwayne knew it. Not exactly how much, perhaps. But he knew she owned her home and two other properties. He knew that her mother and husband had recently died. And he knew she was in love. January 25 came and went. A new problem delayed him; Amy took one of her friends to the concert.

Dwayne apologized profusely and sent her more flowers, again with the promise to pay her back. Soon, he needed more money. She wired another $15,000. This part of the con follows a familiar pattern. The scammer promises a payoff — a face-to-face meeting — that forever recedes as crises and logistical barriers intervene.

As February wore on, Amy was still telling friends that Dwayne was coming in a matter of days or weeks. But she never mentioned the money she was lending him. It's not that she was intentionally misleading anyone. But she knew it would be hard for them to understand — especially now that she was in for more than $100,000. She'd get it back as soon as he came, of course. When doubt started to creep into her mind, she would look at his pictures or read his messages. Still, almost in spite of herself, she wondered.

Little things seemed odd. Sometimes, out of the blue, he'd fire off a series of rapid-fire instant messages—"oh baby i love you" and so forth. It felt almost like she was talking to someone else. Another time, she asked what he had for dinner and was surprised to hear his answer—stir-fried chicken.

But I thought you hated chicken. He laughed. "Oh, Amy. You know me better than that." "Send me a selfie, right now," she commanded him one night. To her relief, she got a photo moments later.

There he was, sitting on a bench in the sun on the other side of the world. Psychologists call this "confirmation bias" — if you love someone, you look for reasons they are telling the truth, not reasons they are lying. We tend to find what we are looking for. And Amy was looking, desperately, for reasons to trust Dwayne, because the money was really adding up. "How do I know you're not a Nigerian scammer?" she once asked, playfully.

He laughed. "Oh, Amy. You know me better than that." Besides, he'd be there on February 28. She planned to make dinner for him that first night. She bought all his favorite foods — fresh salmon, sourdough bread, a nice Merlot. The trip would take more than a day: He had to fly to Beijing, then Chicago, and finally connect to Virginia.

He'd call her as soon as he got to Chicago. His last message was a brief text that he said he sent from the airport in Kuala Lumpur.

I'll be home soon my love. Then, when the day finally came, Amy's phone remained silent, despite her efforts to get in touch. Something must have gone wrong. Why hadn't he called or texted her back? He always called. Always. She tried to tamp down the pinpricks of panic. When she collapsed into bed that night, she thought about how this had been the first day in almost three months that they hadn't spoken.

There wasn't a single thunderclap of realization. But that week, it all came apart. Dwayne finally contacted Amy three days later. He sent a single text. Something about being held up by immigration at the airport in Kuala Lumpur and needing money to bribe the officials.

This was the third time that Dwayne had failed to show, the third last-minute catastrophe. Still, she wired him the money. Amy's sister-in-law was the first to figure it out. "You need to see this," she told Amy, sending her a link to a recent episode of the Dr.

Phil show, in which the TV therapist confronted two women who claimed to be engaged to men they'd met online. Amy watched in growing horror. A few days later, Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 disappeared. This was the same Beijing-bound route Dwayne had planned to be on earlier. As the story of the vanished airliner filled the airwaves, Amy couldn't help but worry that Dwayne had been aboard — maybe he'd managed to take a later flight?

Finally, he called her. But the call went to her home landline, not the mobile phone she'd been using. They spoke for only a few moments before it broke up. She was relieved but also disturbed — and curious. Something was different. The daily siege of calls and emails and messages had ended.

Suddenly, she wasn't tied up for hours every day. Alone with her thoughts for the first time in months, everything about their relationship seemed to blur. How much do I really know this guy? One by one, she started feeding the photos Dwayne had sent her into Google's image search, trying to trace where else they might have come from.

Eventually, up popped the LinkedIn page of a man with a name she'd never heard. Whoever Dwayne was, this wasn't him. She Googled "romance scam" and started reading. Even as she discovered the truth, part of her held out hope that her case was somehow different — that she was the lucky one.

But the spell had broken. It was like waking up from a deep sleep — those strange moments when the dream dissolves and the real world comes rushing back. The money … Oh, God. How much? Looking at the numbers, the figure seemed unreal. She had sent Dwayne more than $300,000. If you peruse the archives of , a resource center and support group for dating fraud, you can see Amy's story repeated again and again, with only minor variations. In a decade, the site has collected about 60,000 reports, from men and women, young and old.

"People think victims are all lonely old women who can't get a date, but I've seen doctors, lawyers, police officers," says Barbara Sluppick, who founded the site in 2005. "One of the most heartbreaking questions we get is, 'What can I do to get my money back?' But it's gone. There's no way." Some of the most aggressive efforts to track down scammers have come from Australia. Brian Hay, head of the fraud unit of the Queensland Police Service in Brisbane, has orchestrated sting operations that have led to the arrest of about 30 scammers based in Malaysia or Nigeria.

But so dim are the chances of successfully finding offenders that, he admits, he rarely tells victims about these prosecutions: "I don't want to get their hopes up." Hay has also built a close relationship with Nigeria's Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), which was established in 2002, in part to rein in the country's rampant 419 culture.

He's inspected the computer logs of scam operations, where teams of Yahoo Boys cooperate to systematically exploit victims, using playbooks that script out conversations months in advance. Some scammers specialize in phone work; others, in writing or computer hacking. Still others work the late phases of the scam, impersonating bank officials or law enforcement in an effort to con victims who are trying to get their money back.

Think romance fraud on an industrial scale. "The strongest drug in the world is love," Hay says. "These bastards know that. And they're brilliant at it." Where does all the money go? Investigators fret about West Africa's terrorism links — northern Nigeria is home to the notorious insurgent group Boko Haram — and its role in international drug trafficking. While the EFCC has made some high-profile arrests, only a relative handful of fraudsters are brought to justice.

And, as Amy discovered, victims in the U.S. have few options. When she talked to an agent at her regional FBI office, she says, they took her report — and told her that a woman in the next town had lost $800,000. The psychological toll is harder to quantify.

The trauma is twofold: Besides the financial loss, scam victims endure the destruction of a serious relationship. "It's like finding out someone you loved has died, and you'll never see them again," Sluppick says.

"Everything you knew has disappeared. People have to go through a grieving process." To compound the damage, victims blame themselves — and their family and friends often do, too.

"People think, 'Why did I let this happen to me?' But you're a victim of a crime — it's like you were raped," she says. In Australia, Hay has found that face-to-face victim support groups are helpful.

But Whitty notes that, for many, denial is the easier path: A surprising number of victims end up getting scammed again. "Awareness of the scam isn't going to change their perspective," she says. "Part of them still wants desperately for it to be real." Other victims fall into the risky practice of scam baiting, a kind of digital vigilantism: They attempt to turn the tables and lead scammers on with promises of future riches.

Months after she discovered the scam, Amy continued talking with Dwayne, promising him another $50,000 if he would send her various documents. Her hope was that she'd be able to lure him into giving up something incriminating.

She found the neighborhood in Kuala Lumpur that he said he lived in, and she prowled its streets using the Street View feature on Google Maps, looking for some landmark he might have mentioned. Sometimes, he'd still call her in the middle of the night, and she'd hear that familiar voice for a few moments. Finally, Amy accepted that Dwayne — whoever and wherever he was — would never show his true face, never give her the confession she yearned to hear.

She abandoned her hunt. She made up a story about how she was being investigated for money laundering — this was a real possibility, given the amount of money she'd wired overseas — and even typed it up on a fake government letterhead.

On New Year's Eve 2014, one year after he had sent that first bouquet of flowers, she emailed it to Dwayne, with a note telling him not to contact her. They were done. A few minutes later, he texted her back.

He promised not to call her anymore. "I know you're innocent," he wrote. "And so am I." Doug Shadel is a former fraud investigator and the head of . David Dudley is a features editor at . In the next 24 hours, you will receive an email to confirm your subscription to receive emails related to AARP volunteering. Once you confirm that subscription, you will regularly receive communications related to AARP volunteering. In the meantime, please feel free to search for ways to make a difference in your community at


best dating scamming format

best dating scamming format - How to Spot an Online Dating Scammer


best dating scamming format

Hello, Well, I know you must have received about 20 emails like this everyday, so I have been thinking really hard about how to make mine stand out. I think your profile makes you worth emailing,and i really enjoyed reading what you wrote.I thought we may share some similar interests and I would love to learn more about you. I'm Jennifer Williams from GA, I am a very sensual, sexual and passionate woman.

I love life and see the glass half full. I am always mesmerized by the ocean and want the person I am with to feel a connection also.

I love to be fun and spontaneous and enjoy each day finding something joyful to smile about? Drop me a line and we can go from there.This is my personal email addresse just incase you feel like emailing me or better still come catch me online @ Yahoo Instant Messenger and here is my Yahoo Messenger screen name; jennyluv_sera ....kindly get back to me telling me a bit about yourself ok.

Enjoy your day and I look forward to hearing from you! Jenny. Hello, I will want you please tell me more about yourself before we go on with this conversation,i am a lady that need to get to know more about the opposite side before moving on.so i will be very happy to know more about you if you can asnwer all my questions with all honesty of heart... what is your name ? How old are you ? what do you do for fun? what do you do for a living ? what your marital status?

Tell me about your past relationship if married before ? How long did your last relationship last? Do you have kids ? How many kids do you ? Will you like to have more kids if you finally get a woman of your dream? What is your best colour?

what is your best food? want to know if you are a vegtarian of junk foods? Do you live alone or stay with friends? Do you smoke? Do you drink? what was your may motive of join the Dating Site? And how long have you been on the dating site?

what are the qualities that you like in a woman if a woman is what you really need in your life? Do what want long time ot life relationship? Do you want just someone to be with for the main time and nothing serious for now? I will be waiting for your reply as soon as you can take good care of yourself Jenny. Hello , I think i will also have to answer all the questions i asked you, by so doing you will know much about me and if you which to ask any other thing i will be here to answer you to with all honesty, so I am Jennifer Williams I am 32 years old I love mostly outdoors for fun, like i love reading, listening to music and clubbing,I love dirt bike riding, snowboarding, taking my boat to the lake, wakeboarding and fishing and i also love visiting new places and lot more....

I am personal assistant and i worked for my late father company, he had an oil investment company based in the UK. I am single and never married I am not married for once , but i have been into a long time relationship which laid me into hard times and it hurts me so dearly and i don't to be hurt by any man like that again..

my last relationship lasted for 2 years and and some months I don't have kids I will love to have kids if i can find a very good and loving man of my dream my best colour is Blue and i can also go with Yellow I love vegetable and shrimp. I stay alone . I don't smoke but i drink socially I mean motive of joining the dating site is just to meet someone that can match my dream man and my chrming knight . I just joined the dating site last week The Qualities i want in my dream Man is to always love me that will be caring, funny, intelligent, romantic,faithful,honest,that have sense of humor and the most important thing is Love I don't want only a long time relationship but a life time Soulmate.

And i also need a serious man in my life I think now you know much about me too , i will want to ask you some other question later if you still interested,i will be waiting for your reply .Jenny Hi ,How are you doing? Its such a great pleasure reading from you, well here is a little about me and what I have been told about myself...I love restaurant,camping,snuggling by a campfire & making love under the stars,or in the confines of a cosy tent setting.

Either way its a very sensual way to spend a great weekend.My other interest include swimming, reading novels,writting poems, cooking, movies, riding, boating & fishing in the Gulf. I like the simple things in life.What's important is being true to who you are & not being afraid to show it.

I value Humanitarian works and charity and this is the reason why I have dedicated myself into it.I have a strong faith in God and would want someone with the same belief.Someone that can be a comfort to me & wouldn't be afraid to learn on me for the same.

Honesty is very important.I'm looking for someone that is not afraid to show open affection. I'm a little bit shy and I need someone that is easy to talk to until we get better aquainted. I want someone that is positive and loves life, looks on the bright side.I'm loyal and honest. Most of all I want to have a partner thats just that,a partner.

I'm looking for a man thats as good a friend as they are a lover.That combination along with honesty & a strong faith in God go along way in a successful relationship.I'm not a woman of unlimited worldly means,but I am true to the core. A true friend & faithful to the man that shares my values.

Family, friends, faith & a strong desire to satisfy my man both physically & emotionally. I was born in GA, but was raised in Paris because i lost my mom since my child birth and i was handover to my grandma when my grandma remarry to a french man she relocate to paris, I work with my dad has his personal assistant before he met his death on 9/11, present am out of GA am in West Africa because i was invited here with some group of people, I learnt Art and Crafts and Fashion designing and also run a charity organisation too, I have a strong belief in The God that I serve and this why I always have it at the back of my mind that he is always there for me..

Tell me more about yourself, I'm looking forward to reading from you.. and also would love to have a chat with you... Take good care of yourself and have a lovely dayJenny.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- hey, After All about myself and getting to know more of you , think we should get to know some other thing about eachother.I will want to know your main motive on here and i will also want to know if you are looking for just a friend or someone more than a friend to you ,i will want to know if you need a serious lady in your life.

i still have a lot questions for ask you as time goes on because i will not like to waiste my time with anybody online because i don't want to get hurt anymore.

so get back to me as soon as possible with all honesty of heart.Just give a piece of your mind on your reply. I will be waiting for your mail Thanks Jenny Care[/quote Thanks so much for your mail, i want to ask you this questions and i want you to keep up the honesty you have been showing to your mail and what you tell me about yourself.This are very important question to me and to any relationship before going into it .I want you know if you do believe in LOVE and if yes can you just tell me waht means to you ?

bcos i believe if you don't know love or believe in Love you can not love and be loved in return by anyone.we all know LOVE is the root of all relationship . so tell me what love is to you if you truely believe in it and if you really looking for a soulmate or a second half.i am a very loving woman and i believe so much in love . Get back to me cos i am getting more intrested in getting to meet you in person.waiting for your reply OXOXOXJenny.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I love the way you have putting how much love means to you but to me LOVE means alot because i believe so much in LOVE, I'm talking about fate here - when feelings are so powerful it's as if some force beyond your control is guiding you to someone who can make you happy beyond your wildest dreams and i believe Love is not about finding the right person, but creating a right relationship.

It's not about how much love you have in the beginning but how much love you build till the end.Must women in the present days don't love but lust because they don't really know about love and they are not loving. I believe you should never question if you are in love or not, because if you were you wouldn't need to ask and i also believe the best way to love is to love like you have never been hurt.And i wish to love that way for now and till life end on my side.so i will love to tell more about my past and presently before we go on .

Jenny ==========================================================================================8th Forma Hi , I wouldnt know what you want in a relationship. But i guess the most important thing is being honest with eachother. Though i feel reluctant talking about myself and my current situation to you as i dont know how you'll feel.But i guess its important you know all about me and the situation i am in so that we'll know if we can go further.I've had loads of bad experiences in my past relationships and i wouldnt want to fall into the same problem anymore.I will like you to give me your words that you really love me and that you want to make a new life with me,cos i have been used before and i wouldnt want to be played on again.I am telling you all this, then you can decide if you still want to meet me or not, so that we will not waste each other's time, when you get this mail,kindly give me a response to let me know if you are still interested or not.

I never grew up to know my mum as she died immediately after my birth. I lost my dad on 9/11 in New York, i'm the only daughter of my folks.I grew up in Paris, My ex-boyfriend,David Gareth used me alot and treated me so badly. He absconded with my dad's money which was kept with me after a completion of a contract in EAST UK,When my boy friend got absconded with the undisclosed sum of US dollars, this brought the first brokeup between me and my dad before is death,because he thought we had the deal together, but not knowing that i'm innocent about this.

So my dad has been harsh and tough on me about this. After all these happened to me and caused by my Ex boyfriend, I joined a dating site () where I met an African guy online here who promised heaven and earth that he wants to marry me and make me happy in life; "I never knew I was going from Fry-pan to Fire".

The African man told me of an investment opportunity in Africa and he convinced me to come along with loads of money when coming down. On getting here, all his intention was to take away the money from me, play me and leave me on my own.

I came from the United States with all the money I've gotten from my Dad's business and contracts renumeration. Because the african guy told me of an idea to invest in West African sculptures here. When I got here, he made all possible means to get the money from me and get away with my money.When I noticed this, I took the money and my travelling boxes and deposited it with a Security/Insurance Company here in Africa in order to safe myself and my assets.

Thereafter I left the guy's apartment to an hotel where I am in right now and from which I am communicating to you right now. I don't want to fall into another terrible situation again after all these that I have faced and I am not ready to be used this time. I need to be very very careful of whom i will go out with or date this time. I will need some words from you, which will prove to me about your interest in me and what exactly you want out of our relationship.

I am very eager to have a date now, since i would be coming back to the State as soon as possible you want me to, provided you will treat me in an orderly manner.

Well, let me hang on here till I hear from you. I hope you will understand my situation at this time and I hope you will come to my resucue and be of whom i expect you to be.

I really need to be loved cos i deserve it.I need a man that would always be there for me, who will be like a father and husband to me, i will reciprocate true LOVE as well. Jenny -- Dear, Its a great pleasure reading from you.How are you doing?I really want to get out of here to come to the State.I really need your help and trust to get me out of this mess.I want you to have my words as i promise i wouldnt dis-appoint you,i will really appreciate your assistance towards this.Once i get there, we will arrange things in order and we can start a new life together.I want to believe that you will not let me down.

Babes as i have told you what brought me here from the States. I came in here with a total sum of $10.5millionUSD including the money i got from my dad's business and contracts renumeration.While i was coming here, the african guy told me to come with enough money for investment and i even go to the extent of selling my inheritted house just because i want to leave the State .Now, i'm in need of your help, i've gotten enuogh money to run myself when I get to the State, i want to come over to your end and we can start a new life together, I don't want to live here anymore.As you know i'm a foreigner here and its absolutely dangerous for me out here.Thats why i need your gesture assistance.

How i want you to help me? As i'm scared of being setup by this African guy,i had to act fast for safety.I put this money in a box and got it locked up with a security code known to me only.I deposited the box with some of my travelling luggages with a Security and Insurance Company who render private diplomatic delivery service and i told them that the two boxes are my travelling luggage, which I want to send forth to the State because i'm returning home, then i paid them up their custody and security fee, but i did not tell them that the boxes contain money in order to make everything secure and safe.

I want the boxes sent to you while i catch up with you as soon as it is been delivered to you.Babes we would meet and we can start a new life together.Every arrangement for the delivery is perfect, I have obtained customs papers for private freight and there are seals on the box showing that it is a private delivery and check performed, it is free from customs checks, it will be delivered at your door step by the diplomats of the security company, you do not need to burn out to receive it.

And the boxes have security codes lock known to me only, only me can open the boxes, except if I tell anyone the Code, so the Boxes cannot be opened on the Way of delivery to you. Therefore, I want you to contact me as soon as possible, so that I can give you all my deposit details and information for you to make the Clearance from the Security Company as my fiancee who is to receive my boxes in the State.Once the box gets to you,i will let you know the lock codes to open the boxes and the instructions, then you can open the boxes in order to have some money sent to me for my flight to the State.

Once I get there, we shall invest the money together and start a new family, provided you will not disappoint neither take advantage of me. I hereby promise 30% of the total fund for you to meet any personal needs and i can get something done with the balance.

I am counting on you with trust and i'll appreciate your trust towards this.I hope to hear from you and to meet you in person.Please write me as soon as possible, so that I can give you the deposit details and the contact of the security company to arrange the shipment asap.

With all care, Jenny Hey, So all you will do for me to get the boxes, is to write to the security/ company as the receipient of my travelling luggages , just tell them you are my fiancee and you want my travelling luggage sent to you in USA. Because i told them that it is my travelling luggages, and i have locked the boxes with a security 4 codes, which prevent it from been opend by an authorized person.

So i deposited the boxes with the security company as a Private shipment (free from checks) and it will be deliver to your door-step, you do not need to burn out to receive. Therefore, below are my deposit details and the contact of the security company. You can write to them to inform them that you want the boxes delivered to you as soon as possible and ask them how much the clearance fee will cost. I did pay them already the Deposit Fee Security Fee Shipment Fee, only the clearance fee is to be paid.

Please, bear in mind not to tell the company that the boxes contains money, only say travelling luggage of,(Miss Jessica Baxter) N.B: Without you including this Depositing details in your mail, your mail will not be acknowledge. DEPOSIT DETAILS: Deposit Ref#: GSC-POL-0669-PRVT3450 Clearance Sort Code: PRVT-3450-69GSC Deposit Certificate #: 3450/PPPOL/234NG Depositor: Miss Jessica Baxter CONTACT DETAILS: Contact Officer: Jude Peters (Custodian Managers) Emails: Custodian Mangers Direct Phone: +2348063474560 So, you can write to them and get back to me asap.

Please Baby you will help pay them the clearance fee,and as soon as the boxes get to you, i will let you know the code and you can have your money from the boxes and then send me money for my flight, so i could come over and meet with you.

I wait your message as soon as you contact the security company. Jenny


best dating scamming format

This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. Together, they cited information from , which can be found at the bottom of the page. carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article meets our high standards.

The wikiHow Tech Team also followed the article's instructions and validated that they work. Understand the driving principles behind scamming techniques.

Scammers typically try to find people who seem vulnerable (e.g., widowers or single, older people). Once a scammer makes a connection with a victim, they will request money for an emergency (e.g., a hospital bill) or a circumstantial event (e.g., a plane ticket to come see you). • You can avoid the bulk of online dating scams by establishing a hard rule about not sending money to anyone you haven't met in person.

Look for typical scammer behavior. While no two scammers are identical, nearly all dating scammers will exhibit several of the following behaviors: • Insistence on taking the conversation off of the dating service (e.g., asking to text or email) • Repeatedly asking for odd personal information (e.g., your location) • Disconcertingly dramatic, erratic, or otherwise strange behavior (in all likelihood, you'll want to avoid dating people like this anyway) • Early or inappropriate professions of love Review the person's profile.

Common scammer profiles are modeled differently depending on whether they are male or female, but you'll usually see several of the following attributes if the person is a scammer: • High income • Average height • Attractive • No political persuasion • Engineer (male) or student (female) • Mid-40s (male) or low 30s (female) Check their photo for duplicates. Save a copy of their profile photo, then to search for other instances of it.

If you see several other sites with the photo pop up in the results, then you know that—at the very least—they're not using their own photo. • If you do determine that they're not using their own photo, consider calling them out. This may reveal more suspicious behavior. Look closely at their side of the conversation. When communicating, scammers' messages will be full of inconsistencies, often getting their own name or your name wrong.

These messages may be badly written or repeat themselves. Watch for these other signs: • Their command of language deteriorates with time. They may even start out having no clue about grammar or punctuation. • They make mistakes in that their "story" begins to contradict itself. • Alternatively, they never provide any personal details about themselves. • They mix pronouns (he/she, him/her). • They mention things that seem entirely unrelated to the profile they've built up of themselves, or that seem too revealing and even unbelievable.

Ask them to meet up. Scammers will never meet you in person, and they will usually express reluctance to do so when asked. • If the person with whom you're talking either outright refuses to meet you or bails on your plans multiple times in a row, they're most likely a scammer.

• Alternatively, the person may ask you to pay for their ticket or means of transportation. Ask to contact the person via video or voice chat. If the person isn't willing to meet up, consider asking if you can contact them at their number (never your own) or via a voice- or video-chat app such as Skype. If they agree to this, pay attention to their tone and use of language; if their demeanor seems to contradict what you know about them, it's best to walk away.

• Again, if the person outright refuses to talk to you over an audio or video connection, they're most likely a scammer. Watch out for the catch. When scammers think they have you on their hook, they attempt to reel you in. This is usually when they will "agree" to meet up or talk to you, but their plans to do so will usually be interrupted by a financial emergency.

• As a general rule, if the person to whom you're talking asks for money in any context, they're a scammer. • Don't fall for phrases like "For this to work, we both have to trust each other" or "I thought you loved me"; this is a form of emotional manipulation.

Keep your profile as private as possible. One of the first steps in making your profile scammer-proof is limiting the amount of information they can see. If possible, restrict your country/state/region, phone number, email address, job, and any other personal information from your public profile. • Most services require you to display your age, a description, and a picture.

Outside of those items, you should keep the rest of your profile blank. • Scammers require quite a bit of information about you before they can attempt to reel you in, so limiting their leverage from the start decreases your odds of being targeted.

Don't give potential scammers leverage over you. A common scam involves the scammer saving any risque photos, videos, and/or messages sent to them, uploading them to a public website, and using the uploaded content to blackmail the sender into paying them. As such, avoid sending messages that reveal who you are, at least at first. • This doesn't mean that you can't interact with the person as you please; just remember that anything you send to a stranger online can be used against you.

• Avoid sending photos or videos that show friends or family, or that give away your location. Keep your discussions on the dating site. If you're using a dating site that has a built-in chat option (as most do), your safest bet is to keep your conversations with the other person limited to the dating site's chat.

If the other person suggests moving to email or texting, decline. • This will usually allow your selected dating site to review the contents of your messages if you decide to report the other person as a scammer. • Keeping discussions within the dating service will also allow you to block the person later (if needed) without having to block them in your email or on your phone as well.

Avoid giving out your real phone number. If you must move the conversation over to your smartphone, don't tell the other person your number. This doesn't mean that you have to give someone a fake number; there are plenty of free mobile instant messaging services—WhatsApp, Skype, , and Facebook Messenger are only a few examples—that can be used to message someone freely without having to compromise your real phone number.

• If the person to whom you're talking refuses to use any mode of conversation except your phone number, there's a decent chance that they're more interested in the number than in the conversation.

Document your interactions with the person. If you suspect that the person with whom you're conversing is attempting to scam you, there are a few things that you can do to ensure that you have evidence against them: • Refrain from deleting conversations or other forms of communication.

• of the conversations. Stop talking to the person if need be. There's nothing wrong with cutting off contact with someone, especially if you think that they might be a scammer. If you have a bad feeling after interacting with a person online, you don't owe them your time. • Many dating sites will allow you to block the person to whom you're talking. As long as they don't have your email address or phone number, doing this will prevent them from being able to contact you at all.

• If the person becomes unreasonably outraged or sends threats your way, be sure to take screenshots and report the person's profile to the dating service. Community Answer • He would need your account info. Once he has that, he can withdraw money from your account.

Have him open an account with your bank, and transfer the money to that account. Once that is done, and in time, he can add you to that account. Once you see that all is good, then you could have him transfer it to your account, but I would encourage you to keep separate bank accounts, just in case things don't work out. My gut though, is telling me he is a very patient scammer. I have a friend that uses a dating site and the women he's speaking to lied about their age.

Now apparently her father is making threats to him unless he sends money via Western Union. The phone number is on the other side of the states and she is threatening to get the law is involved. What should he do? Community Answer • Scammers don't usually spend money on their victims, rather they demand money from their victims and it never stops. However, spending money on you and then turning around and asking for money could be a case of bait and switch to lower your guard, so be careful.

Ask why they need money so badly if they are spending it on you, as it'd just be easier if they kept that money for their own needs! "It's true people. I am currently playing along with a scammer who is pretending to be a beautiful woman who is very much in love with me. But had to go take care of mum in Africa. She says I'm so handsome (I'm not) and wants to see me in person and hear me. But her cell phone seems to be faulty and her old laptop doesn't have a built in camera.

She wants me to send money to buy one via her money transfer account. (Red flag!) I told her I'm doing a background check. She keeps on trying. Beware." ..." "Everything this said is true. Really appreciated the tip about the Google Search image.

It identified a man who said he was Roden Miller (actually Jeffrey Miller) as a scammer. He said he was a widower with a 14 year old son. He is in the army stationed in Houston Texas but is currently on a peacekeeping mission in Libya but would be returning soon. He friend requested me on FaceBook." ..." "It confirmed the red flags I already look for. They also urge you to give your email and/or phone number right away.

I refuse to give my number or email and insist on staying on that site. I also enjoy toying with these scammers with elaborate stories of wealth, success, and loneliness. This keeps them busy from victimizing another." ..."


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