Best internet dating addiction recovery center

best internet dating addiction recovery center

The guidelines for dating in recovery are similar to the rules of engagement for “normies,” but there are some important differences - 5 tips for success For those in early recovery from addiction, it’s especially important to ease into romantic relationships. Standard advice is to hold off on dating for the first year in recovery, largely because relationships take your focus off of your own healing and, with their emotional highs and lows, are a leading cause of relapse. As your brain and body heal from drug abuse, it can be tempting to replace the high of alcohol and other drugs with the flood of chemicals like norepinephrine, dopamine, phenylethylamine (a natural amphetamine), estrogen and testosterone that create the “high” of new romantic .

best internet dating addiction recovery center

Has your agency, hospital, university, school, clinic, or individual practice considered opening an Internet addiction recovery program? Dr. Young provides clinical training and program development in helping your organization achieve goals to include Internet addiction as part of your portfolio of treatment services, or to build classes and curriculum in Internet addiction recovery. This training program is normally $400 but today, we are offering the course for $280.00 USD or a 30% discount with this promo code: netaddiction.

Discount will be taken at checkout. RESTORE RECOVERY ™ is an evidenced-based training program that outlines assessment and treatment for Internet addiction recovery. Treatment includes areas such as pornography addiction, Internet gambling addiction, online shopping addiction, addictions to social media, and Internet Gaming Disorder. Taught by Dr. Kimberly Young, one of the foremost experts on Internet Addiction disorders, the training program is based on 20 years of research in the field.

The program includes personalized introductions by Dr. Young and three streaming videos along with a comprehensive workbook that can be instantly downloaded or sent in a bounded version. The program allows you to integrate effective methods for treating Internet addiction into your practice. The program is also a useful self-help guide if you or a loved one are suffering from Internet addiction. The program is based on CBT-IA, Dr.

Young’s empirical therapy model – and RESTORE is an acronym for the steps involved in assessing and treating Internet addiction disorders, which is divided into 11 chapters: CHAPTER 1. History of Internet addiction CHAPTER 2. What is Internet addiction? CHAPTER 3.

Consequences of Internet addiction CHAPTER 4. What is RESTORE Recovery ™? CHAPTER 5. Assessment of Internet addiction: Daily behavior and usage CHAPTER 6. Assessment of Internet addiction: Co-occurring conditions CHAPTER 7. Assessment of Internet Addiction: Situational factors CHAPTER 8. Treating Cognitive Distortions CHAPTER 9. Observable Changes in Behavior CHAPTER 10. Relapse Prevention CHAPTER 11. Evaluate success, change and maintain There is a broad audience for this tutorial from social workers, college counselors, addiction counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, clinical nurses, and child and family therapists to support staff, case managers, and peer coaches. Anyone interested in recovery from Internet addiction will benefit from participating.

Specifically, the tutorial is intended to be used by: • Consumers or people who experience Internet Addiction- provides help in your recovery • Family members and friends – provides tools to support recovery for loved ones • Peer practitioners and support staff -provides peer support tools and resources • Case managers and other direct service staff -teaches treatment strategies for clients and tools to share • Clinical and Medical staff -provides evidenced – based recovery methods for your practice This training program is a made up of three streaming videos along with a FREE BONUS video on Treating Smartphone Addiction based on the RESTORE RECOVERY ™ model.

The program contains detailed handouts and assessment tools in each chapter area so that you will be ready to build Internet Addiction Recovery in your individual or group practice, agency, hospital, or clinic. This training program is worth $400 but today, we are offering the toolkit at $280 USD or a 30% discount.

You will receive a link to stream the three videos, and the bonus video, as well as a download link for the downloadable handouts. Enter promo code netaddiction at checkout to enjoy your discount.

The program covers all aspects of assessment and treatment of Internet addiction including program evaluation and success management options. This training program contains three streaming videos, along with a free bonus training on Treating Smartphone Addiction based on the RESTORE RECOVERY ™ model. The program contains various digital handouts and assessment tools in each chapter area so that you will be ready to build Internet Addiction Recovery in your individual or group practice, agency, hospital, or […] We have been successfully treating Internet addiction since 1995.

Dr. Young has become the world’s leading expert and trains other professionals and specializes entirely on Internet-related problems. She offers trainings throughout the world to hospitals, clinics, and agencies that provide best practices in healthcare within this rapidly evolving new field.

Her work is licensed and supported through over two decades of research and published studies. Please view our .


best internet dating addiction recovery center

best internet dating addiction recovery center - Technology and internet addiction: How to recognize it and recover from it


best internet dating addiction recovery center

A Growing Epidemic What is Internet addiction and how much time online is too much? How young is too young for children to go online?

What can you do to better manage your technology use in your daily life? I address these questions and more in my . I launched the first study on in 1995, I wrote “Caught in the Net” in 1998, the first book to treat Internet addiction, and I have worked ever since to develop and discuss research and treatment for this rapidly evolving problem. Signs of Internet Addiction Meeting 5 of the criteria of the Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire (IADQ) means you are addicted.

• Do you feel preoccupied with the Internet (think about previous online activity or anticipate next online session)? • Do you feel the need to use the Internet with increasing amounts of time in order to achieve satisfaction? • Have you repeatedly made unsuccessful efforts to control, cut back, or stop Internet use? • Do you feel restless, moody, depressed, or irritable when attempting to cut down or stop Internet use? • Do you stay online longer than originally intended?

• Have you jeopardized or risked the loss of significant relationship, job, educational or career opportunity because of the Internet? • Have you lied to family members, therapist, or others to conceal the extent of involvement with the Internet? • Do you use the Internet as a way of escaping from problems or of relieving a dysphoric mood (e.g., feelings of helplessness, guilt, anxiety, depression)?

Other Symptoms Include: • Failed attempts to control behavior • Neglecting friends and family • Neglecting sleep to stay online • Being dishonest with others • Feeling guilty, ashamed, anxious, or depressed as a result of online behavior • Weight gain or loss, backaches, headaches, carpal tunnel syndrome • Withdrawing from other pleasurable activities Read about my first novel, Look at my blog for my novel at The Center for Internet Addiction was founded by Dr.

Kimberly Young in 1995. It provides treatment for Internet addiction using CBT-IA©, Young’s specialized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Internet addiction and is the first evidenced-based Digital Detox™ recovery program.

Dr. Young provides hourly private sessions, , forensic assessments, and corporate consultation. She has developed as your educational resource for her research articles, books, blog, and tests, including the IAT.


best internet dating addiction recovery center

In the early months of recovery, you’ve given up a lot — your go-to coping strategy, your social network, your approach to life. It’s natural to look to the comfort of new love to counteract the loneliness. Relationships can be part of healing, but finding healthy partners who support your recovery is a challenge. While the guidelines for dating in recovery are similar to the rules of engagement for “normies,” a few rules are critical to your success: #1 Be a stranger.

Dating carries obvious risks. You’re sharing personal information with someone you don’t know well who may or may not be who they say they are. Safety can be of even greater concern for the 40 million people dating online where it’s easy to hide behind anonymity, make up personas and date multiple people at the same time.

“Safety should be at the forefront of everyone’s mind,” says Stan Tatkin, PsyD, MFT, and assistant clinical professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “In this digital age, we mostly know nothing about our courting partner.” As a couples therapist, Dr.

Tatkin has seen many online dating success stories. But, like other ways of meeting someone, he says it’s a “roll of the dice.” It’s important to carefully vet a prospective mate and avoid feeling too familiar too quickly. Ask yourself: Would you feel confident introducing this person to your friends or family?

Does the person show signs of addictive thinking or behavior? Does this person share your interests and have the characteristics you’re looking for in a partner? “There is no way to know someone right away,” Dr. Tatkin warns. “There’s no forcing this process of knowing, only ways of fooling ourselves. It takes approximately a year to know another person as separate from our fantasies about them and us. So the proper etiquette is to be a stranger, which is what you are.” #2 Beware of nature’s love cocktail.

Compounding the fact that we know very little about a date, our brains release a powerful cocktail of arousing chemicals, compromising our judgment and making us more vulnerable to danger.

We are at “hormone sea,” as Dr. Tatkin describes it, at the mercy of chemicals that drive us to procreate. For those in early recovery from addiction, it’s especially important to . Standard advice is to hold off on dating for the first year in recovery, largely because relationships take your focus off of your own healing and, with their emotional highs and lows, are a leading cause of relapse.

As your brain and body heal from drug abuse, it can be tempting to replace the high of alcohol and other drugs with the flood of chemicals like norepinephrine, dopamine, phenylethylamine (a natural amphetamine), estrogen and testosterone that create the “high” of new romantic love. For some, relationships and sex emerge as an . Some may find themselves attracted to someone who is also struggling with addiction, emotionally unavailable or abusive. See infatuation for what it is — a powerfully intoxicating chemical cocktail in your brain — and resist jumping to conclusions that destiny brought you together or you’ve finally found your soul mate after just a few dates.

#3 Be the partner you would want to have. When conflict inevitably arises in a relationship, it’s easy to point the finger at prospective partners as being flawed and needing to change. If you find yourself being a magnet for all the wrong people or feeling “relationship challenged,” the path toward genuine intimacy may start with you. “Most people are drawn to partners at their same level of emotional development,” says Neil Strauss, of The Truth: An Uncomfortable Book About Relationships.

“Instead of trying to ‘fix’ the other person, get help for what you can control: yourself.” Who you choose as a partner offers a wealth of insights into your own challenges.

What drew you to a given partner? Use what you discover to heal yourself and the relationship if it’s one worth investing in. “By working on your own emotional health, you’ll be able to meet someone at a higher level of emotional maturity and capability for love,” says Strauss.

#4 Be honest about who you are. Recovery is very personal, so should you open up about it with someone you barely know? If so, when? The answer depends on a variety of factors, including whether you think the relationship has potential, but as a general rule it’s wise to reveal your recovery right up front. But, warns Dr.

Tatkin, “don’t go into detail unless asked. No one wants to hear about your trials and tribulations with your addictive past.” With 23 million people in recovery from addiction, there’s a good chance the person you’re dating also has been touched by addiction in some way.

Whether it’s your recovery or some other aspect of your personality or life experience, let a prospective partner get to know you for who you really are, not who you want to be or who you think they want you to be. “Your new courtship is an audition. You must be yourself but understand that you have no privileges with your stranger partner — yet,” Dr. Tatkin advises. “It’s good to let your new partner know who you are, including your annoying parts, as long as you rein in those annoying parts for a good amount of time.

If you’re a distancer, it may be a good idea to signal that early. If you are someone who tends to cling, that too may be good to announce fairly early. Telling someone something unattractive about yourself is different than acting out those unattractive or threatening behaviors.” #5 Assess your relationship potential.

Once you’ve started getting to know someone, step back and consider whether the relationship is worth pursuing. In his book Wired for Dating, Dr. Tatkin recommends assessing your relationship for these five characteristics: • Security — you protect one another, regardless of whether you’ve been on a couple of dates or have been together for years • Sensitivity — you recognize and respond to each other’s needs • Fairness — you quickly work to repair any hurts • Collaboration — you help one another learn about each other • True mutuality — you recognize that what’s good for one of you is good for the other If these principles are at work in your relationship, your relationship has a good chance of success, says Dr.

Tatkin. However, “if you find a dating relationship does not embody these principles, you have good grounds for calling it quits and moving on,” he writes. If you’ve spent a lot of time around people with addictions or other mental health issues (for example, growing up with an addicted parent or surrounding yourself with drug-using friends), it can be difficult to feel connected to people who are well.

In early recovery, time spent figuring out who you really are is the best way to find someone to complement your sober life.

When the time is right, “go for it!” says Dr. Tatkin, but set a pace that works for you and your recovery. Sources:


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