Best julian date code format json

best julian date code format json

julian.toMillisecondsInJulianDay (date). returns the number of milliseconds since the start of the julian day. Note, the julian day starts at noon, not at midnight If you want to display calendar dates in format appropriate for a given culture at a given time in history - well, first of all, good luck to you. For example, the October Revolution took place in what most of us now call November. That's because in Tsar's Russia they still used obsolete Julian calendar until bolsheviks finally adopted Gregorian.

best julian date code format json

1. Overview In this tutorial, we’ll serialize dates with Jackson. We’ll start by serializing a simple java.util. Date, then Joda-Time as well as the Java 8 DateTime.

2. Serialize Date to Timestamp First – let’s see how to serialize a simple java.util.Date with Jackson. In the following example – we will serialize an instance of “ Event” which has a Date field “ eventDate“: @Test public void whenSerializingDateWithJackson_thenSerializedToTimestamp() throws JsonProcessingException, ParseException { SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm"); df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")); Date date = df.parse("01-01-1970 01:00"); Event event = new Event("party", date); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.writeValueAsString(event); } What’s important here is that Jackson will serialize the Date to a timestamp format by default (number of milliseconds since January 1st, 1970, UTC).

The actual output of the “ event” serialization is: { "name":"party", "eventDate":3600000 } 3. Serialize Date to ISO-8601 Serializing to this terse timestamp format is not optimal. Let’s now serialize the Date to the ISO-8601 format: @Test public void whenSerializingDateToISO8601_thenSerializedToText() throws JsonProcessingException, ParseException { SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm"); df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")); String toParse = "01-01-1970 02:30"; Date date = df.parse(toParse); Event event = new Event("party", date); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.disable(SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS); mapper.setDateFormat(new ISO8601DateFormat()); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(event); assertThat(result, containsString("1970-01-01T02:30:00Z")); } Note how the representation of the date is now much more readable.

4. Configure ObjectMapper DateFormat The previous solutions still lack the full flexibility of choosing the exact format to represent the java.util.Date instances. Let’s now take a look at a configuration that will allow us to set our formats for representing dates: @Test public void whenSettingObjectMapperDateFormat_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException, ParseException { SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm"); String toParse = "20-12-2014 02:30"; Date date = df.parse(toParse); Event event = new Event("party", date); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.setDateFormat(df); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(event); assertThat(result, containsString(toParse)); } Note that, even though we’re now more flexible regarding the date format – we’re still using a global configuration at the level of the entire ObjectMapper.

5. Use @JsonFormat to format Date Next, let’s take a look at the @JsonFormat annotation to control the date format on individual classes instead of globally, for the entire application: public class Event { public String name; @JsonFormat (shape = JsonFormat.Shape.STRING, pattern = "dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss") public Date eventDate; } Now – let’s test it: @Test public void whenUsingJsonFormatAnnotationToFormatDate_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException, ParseException { SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss"); df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC")); String toParse = "20-12-2014 02:30:00"; Date date = df.parse(toParse); Event event = new Event("party", date); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(event); assertThat(result, containsString(toParse)); } 6.

Custom Date Serializer Next – to get full control over the output, we’ll leverage a custom serializer for Dates: public class CustomDateSerializer extends StdSerializer { private SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss"); public CustomDateSerializer() { this(null); } public CustomDateSerializer(Class t) { super(t); } @Override public void serialize (Date value, JsonGenerator gen, SerializerProvider arg2) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException { gen.writeString(formatter.format(value)); } } Next – let’s use it as the serializer of our “ eventDate” field: public class Event { public String name; @JsonSerialize(using = CustomDateSerializer.class) public Date eventDate; } Finally – let’s test it: @Test public void whenUsingCustomDateSerializer_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException, ParseException { SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss"); String toParse = "20-12-2014 02:30:00"; Date date = df.parse(toParse); Event event = new Event("party", date); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(event); assertThat(result, containsString(toParse)); } Further reading: Use Jackson to map custom JSON to any java entity graph with full control over the deserialization process.

→ 7. Serialize Joda-Time with Jackson Dates aren’t always an instance of java.util.Date; actually – they’re more and more represented by some other class – and a common one is, of course, the DateTime implementation from the Joda-Time library. Let’s see how we can serialize DateTime with Jackson. We’ll make use of the jackson-datatype-joda module for out of the box Joda-Time support: com.fasterxml.jackson.datatype jackson-datatype-joda 2.9.6 And now we can simply register the JodaModule and be done: @Test public void whenSerializingJodaTime_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException { DateTime date = new DateTime(2014, 12, 20, 2, 30, DateTimeZone.forID("Europe/London")); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.registerModule(new JodaModule()); mapper.disable(SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(date); assertThat(result, containsString("2014-12-20T02:30:00.000Z")); } 8.

Serialize Joda DateTime with Custom Serializer If we don’t want the extra Joda-Time Jackson dependency – we can also make use of a custom serializer (similar to the earlier examples) to get DateTime instances serialized cleanly: public class CustomDateTimeSerializer extends StdSerializer { private static DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm"); public CustomDateTimeSerializer() { this(null); } public CustomDateTimeSerializer(Class t) { super(t); } @Override public void serialize (DateTime value, JsonGenerator gen, SerializerProvider arg2) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException { gen.writeString(formatter.print(value)); } } Next – let’s use it as our property “ eventDate” serializer: public class Event { public String name; @JsonSerialize(using = CustomDateTimeSerializer.class) public DateTime eventDate; } Finally – let’s put everything together and test it: @Test public void whenSerializingJodaTimeWithJackson_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException { DateTime date = new DateTime(2014, 12, 20, 2, 30); Event event = new Event("party", date); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(event); assertThat(result, containsString("2014-12-20 02:30")); } 9.

Serialize Java 8 Date with Jackson Next – let’s see how to serialize Java 8 DateTime – in this example, LocalDateTime – using Jackson. We can make use of the jackson-datatype-jsr310 module: com.fasterxml.jackson.datatype jackson-datatype-jsr310 2.9.6 Now, all we need to do is register the JSR310Module and Jackson will take care of the rest: @Test public void whenSerializingJava8Date_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException { LocalDateTime date = LocalDateTime.of(2014, 12, 20, 2, 30); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.registerModule(new JSR310Module()); mapper.disable(SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(date); assertThat(result, containsString("2014-12-20T02:30")); } 10.

Serialize Java 8 Date Without any Extra Dependency If you don’t want the extra dependency, you can always use a custom serializer to write out the Java 8 DateTime to JSON: public class CustomLocalDateTimeSerializer extends StdSerializer { private static DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm"); public CustomLocalDateTimeSerializer() { this(null); } public CustomLocalDateTimeSerializer(Class t) { super(t); } @Override public void serialize( LocalDateTime value, JsonGenerator gen, SerializerProvider arg2) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException { gen.writeString(formatter.format(value)); } } Next – let’s use the serializer for our “ eventDate” field: public class Event { public String name; @JsonSerialize(using = CustomLocalDateTimeSerializer.class) public LocalDateTime eventDate; } Now – let’s test it: @Test public void whenSerializingJava8DateWithCustomSerializer_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException { LocalDateTime date = LocalDateTime.of(2014, 12, 20, 2, 30); Event event = new Event("party", date); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); String result = mapper.writeValueAsString(event); assertThat(result, containsString("2014-12-20 02:30")); } 11.

Deserialize Date Next – let’s see how to deserialize a Date with Jackson. In the following example – we deserialize an “ Event” instance containing a date: @Test public void whenDeserializingDateWithJackson_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException, IOException { String json = "{"name":"party","eventDate":"20-12-2014 02:30:00"}"; SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss"); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.setDateFormat(df); Event event = mapper.readerFor(Event.class).readValue(json); assertEquals("20-12-2014 02:30:00", df.format(event.eventDate)); } 12.

Deserialize Joda ZonedDateTime with Time Zone Preserved In its default configuration, Jackson adjusts the time zone of a Joda ZonedDateTime to the time zone of the local context. As, by default, the time zone of the local context is not set and has to be configured manually, Jackson adjusts the time zone to GMT: @Test public void whenDeserialisingZonedDateTimeWithDefaults_thenNotCorrect() throws IOException { ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper(); objectMapper.findAndRegisterModules(); objectMapper.disable(SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS); ZonedDateTime now = ZonedDateTime.now(ZoneId.of("Europe/Berlin")); String converted = objectMapper.writeValueAsString(now); ZonedDateTime restored = objectMapper.readValue(converted, ZonedDateTime.class); System.out.println("serialized: " + now); System.out.println("restored: " + restored); assertThat(now, is(restored)); } This test case will fail with output: serialized: 2017-08-14T13:52:22.071+02:00[Europe/Berlin] restored: 2017-08-14T11:52:22.071Z[UTC] Fortunately, there is a quick and simple fix for this odd default-behavior: we just have to tell Jackson, not to adjust the time zone.

This can be done by adding the below line of code to the above test case: objectMapper.disable(DeserializationFeature.ADJUST_DATES_TO_CONTEXT_TIME_ZONE); Note that, to preserve time zone we also have to disable the default behavior of serializing the date to the timestamp. 13. Custom Date Deserializer Let’s also see how to use a custom Date deserializer; we’ll write a custom deserializer for the property “ eventDate“: public class CustomDateDeserializer extends StdDeserializer { private SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss"); public CustomDateDeserializer() { this(null); } public CustomDateDeserializer(Class vc) { super(vc); } @Override public Date deserialize(JsonParser jsonparser, DeserializationContext context) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException { String date = jsonparser.getText(); try { return formatter.parse(date); } catch (ParseException e) { throw new RuntimeException(e); } } } Next – let’s use it as the “ eventDate” deserializer: public class Event { public String name; @JsonDeserialize(using = CustomDateDeserializer.class) public Date eventDate; } And finally – let’s test it: @Test public void whenDeserializingDateUsingCustomDeserializer_thenCorrect() throws JsonProcessingException, IOException { String json = "{"name":"party","eventDate":"20-12-2014 02:30:00"}"; SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss"); ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); Event event = mapper.readerFor(Event.class).readValue(json); assertEquals("20-12-2014 02:30:00", df.format(event.eventDate)); } 14.

Conclusion In this extensive Date article, we looked at most relevant ways Jackson can help marshalli and unmarshall a date to JSON using a sensible format we have control over. The implementation of all these examples and code snippets can be found in – this is a Maven-based project, so it should be easy to import and run as it is. Eugen – Again, great information! Something that I have been trying to get a definitive answer on for awhile (and the topic is serialization): Spring MVC 4, I’m letting spring serialize my response body using @RestController.

I’d like to use my own serialization. I see a lot of solutions from various sources for spring 3 but nothing for 4 and no consensus on the “right” solution.

Would you be willing to weigh in? Thanks, Bill If I were to use the same entity for serialization and de-serialization, isn’t there an elegant way to specify just one annotation? I have also had use cases where customer would pass two different date formats (sometimes suppressing the time part or the timezone part) that needed to be handled gracefully?

What about “strictness” in formats in the above case? Default date formats are not strict at all. Hey Kisna, The answer to your first question depends on which of these solutions you actually use. If you’re thinking of a simple annotation, usually putting that annotation on the field itself will mean that Jackson is going to use it for both serialization and deserialization. Now, handling 2 different formats sounds like it would need the more flexible custom serializer / deserializer – and some manual checking of the format to get the right one.

Finally, on the default date format, you definitely don’t have to use any default – you can specify your own and make it adhere … Read more » Yes, for the older Java dates, a custom serializer that leverages the efficient JODA API by caching date formats. Is there a good way to inject this JODA based serializer for the old java.util.Date class only instead of mentioning the serializer annotation so many times?

Just trying to figure out a best practice to use JODA for all Dates..


best julian date code format json

best julian date code format json - The “right” JSON date format


best julian date code format json

This document describes the canonical format used to represent Wikibase entities in the API, in JSON dumps, as well as by Special:EntityData (when using JSON output). This format can be expected to be reasonably stable, and is designed with flexibility and robustness in mind.

For an explanation of the terms used in this document, please refer to the . For a specification of the semantics of the data structures described here, see the . Changes to the JSON format are subject to the . NOTE: The canonical copy of this document can be found and should be edited there. Changes can be requested by filing a ticket on . Wikibase follow the JSON specification as given in , aiming for interoperability in the sense of that RFC.

When encoding the Wikibase data structure as JSON, several choices have been made as to how values are represented: • Keys in JSON objects are unique, their order is not significant. • Strings are encoded in one of two ways: • using either Unicode escape sequences (like \u0645) resulting in a UTF16 representation when decoded.

• ...or using native UTF8 encoding. • Numbers may be given in two ways: • integers from -(2^31) to 2^31-1 may be represented as number literals. • all numbers may be represented as decimal strings. In particular, quantity values are represented as arbitrary precision decimal strings. • Entity IDs are given as upper-case strings, e.g. "P29" or "Q623289". • In JSON dumps, each entity is encoded in as a single line.

This allows consumers to process the dump line by line, decoding each entity separately. Clients should be ready to process any of the forms given above. { "id" : "Q60" , "type" : "item" , "labels" : {}, "descriptions" : {}, "aliases" : {}, "claims" : {}, "sitelinks" : {}, "lastrevid" : 195301613 , "modified" : "2015-02-10T12:42:02Z" } The JSON representation consists of the following fields in the top level structure: • id: The canonical ID of the entity. • type: The entity type identifier.

"item" for data items, and "property" for properties. • labels: Contains the labels in different languages, see below. • descriptions: Contains the descriptions in different languages, see below.

• aliases: Contains aliases in different languages, see below. • claims: Contains any number of claims or statements, groups by property. See below.

• sitelinks: Contains site links to pages on different sites describing the item, see below. • lastrevid: The JSON document's version (this is a MediaWiki revision ID).

• modified: The JSON document's publication date (this is a MediaWiki revision timestamp). API modules currently handle the revision and date modified slightly differently using the fields below. { "labels" : { "en" : { "language" : "en" , "value" : "New York City" }, "ar" : { "language" : "ar" , "value" : "\u0645\u062f\u064a\u0646\u0629 \u0646\u064a\u0648 \u064a\u0648\u0631\u0643" } }, "descriptions" : { "en" : { "language" : "en" , "value" : "largest city in New York and the United States of America" }, "it" : { "language" : "it" , "value" : "citt\u00e0 degli Stati Uniti d'America" } }, "aliases" : { "en" : [ { "language" : "en" , "value" : "NYC" }, { "language" : "en" , "value" : "New York" }, ], "fr" : [ { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "New York City" }, { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "NYC" }, { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "The City" }, { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "City of New York" }, { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "La grosse pomme" } ] } } Labels, descriptions and aliases are represented by the same basic data structure.

For each language, there is a record using the following fields: • language: The language code. • value: The actual label or description.

In the case of aliases, each language is associated with a list of such records, while for labels and descriptions the record is associated directly with the language. { "sitelinks" : { "afwiki" : { "site" : "afwiki" , "title" : "New York Stad" , "badges" : [] }, "frwiki" : { "site" : "frwiki" , "title" : "New York City" , "badges" : [] }, "nlwiki" : { "site" : "nlwiki" , "title" : "New York City" , "badges" : [ "Q17437796" ] }, "enwiki" : { "site" : "enwiki" , "title" : "New York City" , "badges" : [] }, "dewiki" : { "site" : "dewiki" , "title" : "New York City" , "badges" : [ "Q17437798" ] } } } Site links are given as records for each site identifier.

Each such record contains the following fields: • site: The site ID. • title: The page title. • badges: Any "badges" associated with the page (such as "featured article").

Badges are given as a list of item IDs. • url: Optionally, the full URL of the page may be included. { "claims" : { "P17" : [ { "id" : "q60$5083E43C-228B-4E3E-B82A-4CB20A22A3FB" , "mainsnak" : {}, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" , "qualifiers" : { "P580" : [], "P5436" : [] } "references" : [ { "hash" : "d103e3541cc531fa54adcaffebde6bef28d87d32" , "snaks" : [] } ] } ] } } A Claim consists of a main value (or main Snak) and a number of qualifier Snaks.

A Statement is a Claim that also contains a (possibly empty) list of references. A claim is always associated with a Property (semantically, the Claim is about the Property), and there can be multiple Claims about the same Property in a single Entity.

This is represented by a map structure that uses Property IDs as keys, and maps them to lists of Claim records. A Claim record uses the following fields: • id: An arbitrary identifier for the claim, which is unique across the repository.

No assumptions can and shall be made about the identifier's structure, and no guarantees are given that the format will stay the same. • type: the type of the claim - currently either statement or claim.

• mainsnak: If the claim has the type value, it has a mainsnak field that contains the Snak representing the value to be associated with the property. See below. The Property specified in the main Snak must be the same as the property the Claim is associated with.

That is, if a value claim is provided for property P17, its main Snak will specify P17 as the property the value is assigned to.

• rank: The rank expresses whether this value will be used in queries, and shown be visible per default on a client system. The value is either preferred, normal or deprecated. • qualifiers: Qualifiers provide a context for the primary value, such as the point in time of measurement.

Qualifiers are given as lists of snaks, each associated with one property. See below. • references: If the Claim's type is statement, there may be a list of references, given as a list of reference records.

See below. Snaks { "claims" : { "P17" : [ { "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P17" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 30 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, }, { "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "somevalue" , "property" : "P17" , }, } ], "P356" : [ { "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P356" , "datatype" : "string" , "datavalue" : { "value" : "SomePicture.jpg" , "type" : "string" } }, } ] } } A Snak provides some kind of information about a specific Property of a given Entity.

Currently, there are three kinds of Snaks: value, somevalue or novalue. A value snak represents a specific value for the property, which novalue and somevalue only express that there is no, or respectively some unknown, value. A Snak is represented by providing the following fields: • snaktype: The type of the snak. Currently, this is one of value, somevalue or novalue. • property: The ID of the property this Snak is about. • datatype: The datatype field indicates how the value of the Snak can be interpreted.

The datatypes could be any other of the datatypes listed on . • datavalue: If the snaktype is value, there is a datavalue field that contains the actual value the Snak associates with the Property. See below. Data Values "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 30 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } "datavalue" : { "value" : "SomePicture.jpg" , "type" : "string" } Data value records represent a value of a specific type.

They consist of two fields: • type: the value type. This defines the structure of the value field, and is not to be confused with the Snak's data type (which is derived from the Snak's Property's data type). The value type does not allow for interpretation of the value, only for processing of the raw structure. As an example, a link to a web page may use the data type "url", but have the value type "string".

• value: the actual value. This field may contain a single string, a number, or a complex structure. The structure is defined by the type field. Some value types and their structure are defined in the following sections.

string "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 30 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } Entity IDs are used to reference entities on the same repository.

They are represented by a map structure containing two fields: • entity-type: defines the type of the entity, such as item or property. • numeric-id: the is the actual ID number. WARNING: wikibase-entityid may in the future change to be represented as a single string literal, or may even be dropped in favor of using the string value type to reference entities.

NOTE: There is currently no reliable mechanism for clients to generate a prefixed ID or a URL from the information in the data value. globecoordinate "datavalue" : { "value" : { "latitude" : 52.516666666667 , "longitude" : 13.383333333333 , "altitude" : null , "precision" : 0.016666666666667 , "globe" : "http:\/\/www.wikidata.org\/entity\/Q2" }, "type" : "globecoordinate" } • latitude: The latitude part of the coordinate in degrees, as a float literal (or an equivalent string).

• longitude: The longitude part of the coordinate in degrees, as a float literal (or an equivalent string). • precision: the coordinate's precision, in (fractions of) degrees, given as a float literal (or an equivalent string). • globe: the URI of a reference globe. This would typically refer to a data item on wikidata.org.

This is usually just an indication of the celestial body (e.g. Q2 = earth), but could be more specific, like WGS 84 or ED50. • altitude: Deprecated and no longer used. Will be dropped in the future. quantity "datavalue" : { "value" : { "amount" : "+10.38" , "upperBound" : "+10.375" , "lowerBound" : "+10.385" , "unit" : "http://www.wikidata.org/entity/Q712226" }, "type" : "quantity" } Quantity values are given as a map with the following fields: • amount: The nominal value of the quantity, as an arbitrary precision decimal string.

The string always starts with a character indicating the sign of the value, either "+" or "-". • upperBound: Optionally, the upper bound of the quantity's uncertainty interval, using the same notation as the amount field.

If not given or null, the uncertainty (or precision) of the quantity is not known. If the upperBound field is given, the lowerBound field must also be given. • lowerBound: Optionally, the lower bound of the quantity's uncertainty interval, using the same notation as the amount field. If not given or null, the uncertainty (or precision) of the quantity is not known.

If the lowerBound field is given, the upperBound field must also be given. • unit: the URI of a unit (or "1" to indicate a unit-less quantity). This would typically refer to a data item on wikidata.org, e.g. for "square kilometer".

time "datavalue" : { "value" : { "time" : "+2001-12-31T00:00:00Z" , "timezone" : 0 , "before" : 0 , "after" : 0 , "precision" : 11 , "calendarmodel" : "http:\/\/www.wikidata.org\/entity\/Q1985727" }, "type" : "time" } Time values are given as a map with the following fields: • time: the format and interpretation of this string depends on the calendar model. Currently, only Julian and Gregorian dates are supported.

The format used for Gregorian and Julian dates use a notation resembling ISO 8601. E.g. "+1994-01-01T00:00:00Z".

The year is represented by at least four digits, zeros are added on the left side as needed. Years BCE are represented as negative numbers, using the historical numbering, in which year 0 is undefined, and the year 1 BCE is represented as -0001, the year 44 BCE is represented as -0044, etc., like XSD 1.0 (ISO 8601:1988) does.

In contrast, the relies on XSD 1.1 (ISO 8601:2004) dates that use the and , where the year 1 BCE is represented as +0000 and the year 44 BCE is represented as -0043. See Wikipedia for more information about the . Month and day may be 00 if they are unknown or insignificant. The day of the month may have values between 0 and 31 for any month, to accommodate "leap dates" like .

Hour, minute, and second are currently unused and should always be 00. Note: more calendar models using a completely different notation may be supported in the future. Candidates include and the . Note: the notation for Julian and Gregorian dates may be changed to omit any unknown or insignificant parts. E.g. if only the year 1952 is known, this may in the future be represented as just " +1952" instead of currently "+1952-00-00T00:00:00Z" (which some libraries may turn into something like 1951-12-31) and the 19th century may be represented as " +18**".

• timezone: Signed integer. Currently unused, and should always be 0. In the future, timezone information will be given as an offset from UTC in minutes. For dates before the modern implementation of UTC in 1972, this is the offset of the time zone from .

Before the implementation of time zones, this is the longitude of the place of the event, expressed in the range −180° to 180° (positive is east of Greenwich), multiplied by 4 to convert to minutes. • calendarmodel: A URI of a calendar model, such as gregorian or julian. Typically given as the URI of a data item on the repository • precision: To what unit is the given date/time significant?

Given as an integer indicating one of the following units: • 0: 1 Gigayear • 1: 100 Megayears • 2: 10 Megayears • 3: Megayear • 4: 100 Kiloyears • 5: 10 Kiloyears • 6: millennium (see for details) • 7: century (see for details) • 8: 10 years • 9: years • 10: months • 11: days • 12: hours (unused) • 13: minutes (unused) • 14: seconds (unused) • before: Begin of an uncertainty range, given in the unit defined by the precision field. This cannot be used to represent a duration.

(Currently unused, may be dropped in the future) • after: End of an uncertainty range, given in the unit defined by the precision field. This cannot be used to represent a duration. (Currently unused, may be dropped in the future) Qualifiers { "qualifiers" : { "P580" : [ { "hash" : "sssde3541cc531fa54adcaffebde6bef28g6hgjd" , "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P580" , "datatype" : "time" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "time" : "+00000001994-01-01T00:00:00Z" , "timezone" : 0 , "before" : 0 , "after" : 0 , "precision" : 11 , "calendarmodel" : "http:\/\/www.wikidata.org\/entity\/Q1985727" }, "type" : "time" } } ], "P582" : [ { "hash" : "f803e3541cc531fa54n7a9ffebde6bef28d87ddv" , "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P582" , "datatype" : "time" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "time" : "+00000002001-12-31T00:00:00Z" , "timezone" : 0 , "before" : 0 , "after" : 0 , "precision" : 11 , "calendarmodel" : "http:\/\/www.wikidata.org\/entity\/Q1985727" }, "type" : "time" } } ] }, } Qualifiers provide context for a Claim's value, such as a point in time, a method of measurement, etc.

Qualifiers are given as snaks. The set of qualifiers for a statement is provided grouped by property ID, resulting in a map which associates property IDs with one list of snaks each. References { "references" : [ { "hash" : "7eb64cf9621d34c54fd4bd040ed4b61a88c4a1a0" , "snaks" : { "P143" : [ { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P143" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 328 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } } ], "P854" : [ { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P854" , "datatype" : "url" , "datavalue" : { "value" : "http: //www.nytimes.com/2002/01/02/opinion/the-bloomberg-era-begins.html" , "type" : "string" } } ] }, "snaks-order" : [ "P143" , "P854" ] } ] } ] } References provide provenance/authority information for individual claims.

Each reference is a set of Snaks structured in a similar way to how qualifiers are represented: Snaks about the same property are grouped together in a list and made accessible by putting all these lists into a map, using the property IDs as keys. By snaks-order the order of those snaks is shown by their property IDs. { "pageid" : 186 , "ns" : 0 , "title" : "Q60" , "lastrevid" : 199780882 , "modified" : "2015-02-27T14:37:20Z" , "id" : "Q60" , "type" : "item" , "aliases" : { "en" : [ { "language" : "en" , "value" : "NYC" }, { "language" : "en" , "value" : "New York" } ], "fr" : [ { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "New York City" }, { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "NYC" } ], "zh-mo" : [ { "language" : "zh-mo" , "value" : "\u7d10\u7d04\u5e02" } ] }, "labels" : { "en" : { "language" : "en" , "value" : "New York City" }, "ar" : { "language" : "ar" , "value" : "\u0645\u062f\u064a\u0646\u0629 \u0646\u064a\u0648 \u064a\u0648\u0631\u0643" }, "fr" : { "language" : "fr" , "value" : "New York City" }, "my" : { "language" : "my" , "value" : "\u1014\u101a\u1030\u1038\u101a\u1031\u102c\u1000\u103a\u1019\u103c\u102d\u102f\u1037" }, "ps" : { "language" : "ps" , "value" : "\u0646\u064a\u0648\u064a\u0627\u0631\u06a9" } }, "descriptions" : { "en" : { "language" : "en" , "value" : "largest city in New York and the United States of America" }, "it" : { "language" : "it" , "value" : "citt\u00e0 degli Stati Uniti d'America" }, "pl" : { "language" : "pl" , "value" : "miasto w Stanach Zjednoczonych" }, "ro" : { "language" : "ro" , "value" : "ora\u015ful cel mai mare din SUA" } }, "claims" : { "P1151" : [ { "id" : "Q60$6f832804-4c3f-6185-38bd-ca00b8517765" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P1151" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 6342720 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" } ], "P625" : [ { "id" : "q60$f00c56de-4bac-e259-b146-254897432868" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P625" , "datatype" : "globe-coordinate" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "latitude" : 40.67 , "longitude" : - 73.94 , "altitude" : null , "precision" : 0.00027777777777778 , "globe" : "http://www.wikidata.org/entity/Q2" }, "type" : "globecoordinate" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" , "references" : [ { "hash" : "7eb64cf9621d34c54fd4bd040ed4b61a88c4a1a0" , "snaks" : { "P143" : [ { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P143" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 328 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } } ] }, "snaks-order" : [ "P143" ] } ] } ], "P150" : [ { "id" : "Q60$bdddaa06-4e4b-f369-8954-2bb010aaa057" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P150" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 11299 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" }, { "id" : "Q60$0e484d5b-41a5-1594-7ae1-c3768c6206f6" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P150" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 18419 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" }, { "id" : "Q60$e5000a60-42fc-2aba-f16d-bade1d2e8a58" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P150" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 18424 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" }, { "id" : "Q60$4d90d6f4-4ab8-26bd-f2a5-4ac2a6eb48cd" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P150" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 18426 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" }, { "id" : "Q60$ede49e3c-44f6-75a3-eb74-6a89886e30c9" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P150" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 18432 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" } ], "P6" : [ { "id" : "Q60$5cc8fc79-4807-9800-dbea-fe9c20ab273b" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P6" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 4911497 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "qualifiers" : { "P580" : [ { "hash" : "c53f3ca845b789e543ed45e3e1ecd1dd950e30dc" , "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P580" , "datatype" : "time" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "time" : "+00000002014-01-01T00:00:00Z" , "timezone" : 0 , "before" : 0 , "after" : 0 , "precision" : 11 , "calendarmodel" : "http://www.wikidata.org/entity/Q1985727" }, "type" : "time" } } ] }, "qualifiers-order" : [ "P580" ], "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "preferred" }, { "id" : "q60$cad4e313-4b5e-e089-08b9-3b1c7998e762" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P6" , "datatype" : "wikibase-item" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "entity-type" : "item" , "numeric-id" : 607 }, "type" : "wikibase-entityid" } }, "qualifiers" : { "P580" : [ { "hash" : "47c515b79f80e24e03375b327f2ac85184765d5b" , "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P580" , "datatype" : "time" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "time" : "+00000002002-01-01T00:00:00Z" , "timezone" : 0 , "before" : 0 , "after" : 0 , "precision" : 11 , "calendarmodel" : "http://www.wikidata.org/entity/Q1985727" }, "type" : "time" } } ], "P582" : [ { "hash" : "1f463f78538c49ef6adf3a9b18e211af7195240a" , "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P582" , "datatype" : "time" , "datavalue" : { "value" : { "time" : "+00000002013-12-31T00:00:00Z" , "timezone" : 0 , "before" : 0 , "after" : 0 , "precision" : 11 , "calendarmodel" : "http://www.wikidata.org/entity/Q1985727" }, "type" : "time" } } ] }, "qualifiers-order" : [ "P580" , "P582" ], "P856" : [ { "id" : "Q60$4e3e7a42-4ec4-b7c3-7570-b103eb2bc1ac" , "mainsnak" : { "snaktype" : "value" , "property" : "P856" , "datatype" : "url" , "datavalue" : { "value" : "http://nyc.gov/" , "type" : "string" } }, "type" : "statement" , "rank" : "normal" } ] }]}, "sitelinks" : { "afwiki" : { "site" : "afwiki" , "title" : "New York Stad" , "badges" : [] }, "dewiki" : { "site" : "dewiki" , "title" : "New York City" , "badges" : [ "Q17437798" ] }, "dewikinews" : { "site" : "dewikinews" , "title" : "Kategorie:New York" , "badges" : [] }, "elwiki" : { "site" : "elwiki" , "title" : "\u039d\u03ad\u03b1 \u03a5\u03cc\u03c1\u03ba\u03b7" , "badges" : [] }, "enwiki" : { "site" : "enwiki" , "title" : "New York City" , "badges" : [] }, "zhwikivoyage" : { "site" : "zhwikivoyage" , "title" : "\u7d10\u7d04" , "badges" : [] }, "zuwiki" : { "site" : "zuwiki" , "title" : "New York (idolobha)" , "badges" : [] } } }


best julian date code format json

@JsonFormat is a general purpose annotation which can be used to serialize a particular type into a specific format. package com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation; ... public @interface JsonFormat{ ... // Datatype-specific configuration to further define formatting aspects.

public String pattern() default ""; //Structure to use for serialization public Shape shape() default Shape.ANY; //java.util.Locale to use for serialization (if needed) public String locale() default DEFAULT_LOCALE; //java.util.TimeZone to use for serialization (if needed) public String timezone() default DEFAULT_TIMEZONE; //whether "lenient" handling should be enabled.

//This is relevant mostly for deserialization of some textual // datatypes, especially date/time types public OptBoolean lenient() default OptBoolean.DEFAULT; //JsonFormat.Feature to explicitly enable for the annotated property public JsonFormat.Feature[] with() default { }; //JsonFormat.Feature to explicitly disable for the annotated property public JsonFormat.Feature[] without() default { }; .... } This tutorial will show how to serialize Date/Calender and Java Enum in a desired format.

Formatting Date By default Date/Calender are serialized as number (i.e. milliseconds since epoch). To serialize them as string, the attribute @JsonFormat#shape should be assigned to JsonFormat.Shape.STRING along with the attribute @JsonFormat#pattern assigned to a desired SimpleDateFormat-compatible pattern.

We can also optionally specify @JsonFormat#timezone or @JsonFormat#locale values. For example @JsonFormat(shape = JsonFormat.Shape.STRING, pattern = "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss Z", timezone="America/New_York") private Date startDate; Formatting enum By default enums are serialized by their names.

To serialize them by ordinals, we can assign the shape as JsonFormat.Shape.NUMBER. For example: @JsonFormat(shape = JsonFormat.Shape.NUMBER) private Dept dept; Example Java Object public class Employee { private String name; @JsonFormat(shape = JsonFormat.Shape.STRING) private Date dateOfBirth; @JsonFormat(shape = JsonFormat.Shape.STRING, pattern = "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss Z", timezone="America/New_York") private Date startDate; @JsonFormat(shape = JsonFormat.Shape.NUMBER) private Dept dept; .............

} public enum Dept { Admin, IT, Sales } With 'dateOfBirth' we just specify the string shape without any pattern; In that case a default String format will be serialized. Serializing to JSON public class ExampleMain { public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { Employee employee = new Employee(); employee.setName("Amy"); employee.setDateOfBirth(Date.from(ZonedDateTime.now().minusYears(30).toInstant())); employee.setStartDate(Date.from(ZonedDateTime.now().minusYears(2).toInstant())); employee.setDept(Dept.Sales); System.out.println("-- before serialization --"); System.out.println(employee); System.out.println("-- after serialization --"); ObjectMapper om = new ObjectMapper(); String jsonString = om.writeValueAsString(employee); System.out.println(jsonString); System.out.println("-- after deserialization --"); System.out.println(om.readValue(jsonString, Employee.class)); } } -- before serialization -- Employee {name='Amy', dateOfBirth=Thu Jul 28 20:20:18 CDT 1988, startDate=Thu Jul 28 20:20:18 CDT 2016, dept=Sales} -- after serialization -- {"name":"Amy","dateOfBirth":"1988-07-29T01:20:18.763+0000","startDate":"2016-07-28 21:20:18 -0400","dept":2} -- after deserialization -- Employee {name='Amy', dateOfBirth=Thu Jul 28 20:20:18 CDT 1988, startDate=Thu Jul 28 20:20:18 CDT 2016, dept=Sales} Without @JsonFormat If we remove all @JsonFormat: public class Employee { private String name; private Date dateOfBirth; private Date startDate; private Dept dept; .............

} In this case output is: Employee {name='Amy', dateOfBirth=Thu Jul 28 15:51:51 CDT 1988, startDate=Thu Jul 28 15:51:51 CDT 2016, dept=Sales} -- after serialization -- {"name":"Amy","dateOfBirth":586126311022,"startDate":1469739111026,"dept":"Sales"} -- after deserialization -- Employee {name='Amy', dateOfBirth=Thu Jul 28 15:51:51 CDT 1988, startDate=Thu Jul 28 15:51:51 CDT 2016, dept=Sales} Example Project Dependencies and Technologies Used: • jackson-databind 2.9.6: General data-binding functionality for Jackson: works on core streaming API.

• JDK 10 • Maven 3.5.4



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