Best teachers date parents of students with learning disabilities

best teachers date parents of students with learning disabilities

This study was done to determine parents' view of students with learning disabilities about the factors influencing on communication between the students' parents and their teachers. Methods-This cross-sectional study has been implemented in 2010 among 81 of persons who refer to the center of learning disabilities Dehkhoda. Samples were selected by the method of availability. Data were collected by the questionnaire included two types of questions related to individual characteristic and the factors affecting on communication.

best teachers date parents of students with learning disabilities

Learning disabilities are surprisingly common: they affect about one in seven Americans. They are a result of differences in brain structure but do not relate to intelligence, behavior, or focus. In short, they are differences that make it difficult to succeed in a typical American school, though they may have relatively little impact on tasks of daily living. • – a reading disorder • – a mathematical disability • – a writing disability • Auditory and Visual Processing Disorders – "sensory disabilities in which a person has difficulty understanding language despite normal hearing and vision." • Nonverbal Learning Disabilities – a neurological disorder which causes problems with "visual-spatial, intuitive, organizational, evaluative and holistic processing functions." Most instruction at home or in school can be adapted to accommodate the needs of students with learning disabilities such as dyslexia or other learning problems.

These strategies can be used to modify instruction in most subject areas to improve students' comprehension of tasks and the quality of their work. • Set the stage for learning by telling children why the material is important, what the learning goals are, and what the expectations are for quality performance.

• Use specific language. Instead of saying, "do quality work," state the specific expectations. For example, in a writing assignment, a teacher might grade based on correct punctuation, spelling, and the inclusion of specific points. If your child does not understand what his teachers expect of him, contact the teacher and ask for details you need to help your child.

Suggest the teacher may want to begin posting that information on a school website so others can use it as well. • Teachers should develop a scoring guide, share it with students, and provide models of examples of each level of performance.

• Never use a student's work as a public example of poor work for the class to see. This is humiliation, and it has no place in any classroom or home. • Have the student repeat back the instructions for a task to ensure he understands. Correct any miscommunication before he begins the actual work. Check back on the student as he works to ensure he is doing the work correctly. Prompt him as necessary to ensure that he corrects any mistakes before he finishes.

• Clearly define classroom expectations for work and behavior. Post them, and use them as a basis of all interactions and class projects.

Making your requirements a part of the classroom or homework routine will help the student meet expectations. • Use graphic organizers to help students understand the relationships between ideas. • Instruction should include specific, step-by-step instructions that are explicitly stated by the teacher and modeled for the student. • Create models of quality work that students can see and analyze. Include both spoken and written explanations of how the work fulfills academic expectations.


best teachers date parents of students with learning disabilities

best teachers date parents of students with learning disabilities - What Teachers Should Know About Students With Disabilities


best teachers date parents of students with learning disabilities

and 21 receiving special education services, according to the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities. As an intellectual disability is the most common type of developmental delay, special education teachers will most likely have a student in their classroom at some point with the condition. Other terms may be used instead of intellectual disability, though it is the preferred term as other terminology has a negative connotation.

Though certain diagnostic tools, such as the “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,” still use the term mental retardation, the work group for the fifth edition of the manual has recommended making the change to the term intellectual disability.

Students with intellectual disabilities may require special services to succeed academically. For example, they may receive special education services or classroom adaptations to help them learn. Bright Hub Education has several articles on intellectual disabilities, which can help parents and teachers understand what an intellectual disability is as well as what educational resources can help students succeed.

Defining an Intellectual Disability With a diagnosis of an intellectual disability, the child has meet certain criteria, including sub-average intellectual functioning, impairments in adaptive functioning, and an onset of symptoms before the age of 18. The severity of the intellectual disability ranges from mild to profound, which differ based on the child’s intellectual quotient, or IQ.

For example, a child with a profound intellectual disability has an IQ below 20 or 25, while a child with a mild intellectual disability has an IQ of 50-55 up to 70.

These articles provide in-depth information on the criteria for an intellectual disability and the different types of intellectual disabilities. • • • • • The Different Causes Several different conditions can cause an intellectual disability. It may result from a genetic condition or a problem during the pregnancy, such as maternal consumption of alcohol. Some children may develop an intellectual disability after birth due to damage to the brain.

Bright Hub has several articles on these causes, such as Down’s syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome, which include teaching tips and accommodations specifically for students with these disorders.

• • • • Educational Services Children with intellectual disabilities may qualify for special educational services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA. Students who qualify for IDEA receive an Individualized Education Plan, or IEP, in which a specialized education plan is made for the child based on her educational needs.

For parents, this process may be confusing or overwhelming. These Bright Hub articles on IDEA explain how special education services can benefit students with intellectual disabilities and how the process works. • • • • Teaching Tips for Special Education Teachers When teaching students with intellectual disabilities, special education teachers can use different adaptations to help them succeed.

This may include using hands-on learning and providing rewards and positive feedback in the classroom. These articles go over different techniques and strategies teachers can use, as well as resources for specific issues, such as cognitive behavioral therapy for test anxiety.

• • • • Life Skills and Modified Lesson Plans With an intellectual disability, children have difficulties with adaptive skills.

For example, they may have trouble with home living, social skills and personal needs. The "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" requires that to receive a diagnosis of an intellectual disability, the child must have impairments in adaptive skills in two different areas.

Lesson plans on adaptive skills can help students work on these skills, thus improving their functioning at school and home. Special education teachers can also use modified lesson plans to teach students about nutrition and cooking. These life skill lesson plans can also be used with older students. • • • • • • Providing the Best Education Possible With the right accommodations and dedicated teachers, students with intellectual disabilities can thrive in the classroom.

These modified lesson plans are just a few examples of adapted lessons that teachers can do to help students learn and succeed. Parents of children with intellectual disabilities can become involved in their children's education by learning about special education services through IDEA and communicating with teachers about their children's progress.

References • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: • American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. American Psychiatric Publishing, 2000. (Fifth Edition terminology effective 10/1/2015) • National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities:


best teachers date parents of students with learning disabilities

Students with learning disorders display weaker capability than their mental and dynamic ability. If these problems are not corrected, they produce lifelong effect on individuals that it seems to be more than disability in reading, writing, and arithmetic skills, and then learning disabilities can influence on mental health and mental status. The cooperation of student, teacher and parent is needed to treat a learning disturbance. Therefore, establishing an effective communication will guarantee the success of reformative process.

This study was done to determine parents' view of students with learning disabilities about the factors influencing on communication between the students' parents and their teachers. Methods-This cross-sectional study has been implemented in 2010 among 81 of persons who refer to the center of learning disabilities Dehkhoda. Samples were selected by the method of availability. Data were collected by the questionnaire included two types of questions related to individual characteristic and the factors affecting on communication.

Descriptive information was adjusted and reported in the way of percentage and ranking. The analytical examination of the chi-square test and multi-way analysis of variance were used to analyze data. All statistical analyses were performed with the SPSS (Version 19) software package.ConclusionThe parents believe that timely and appropriate openness, modesty, confidentialness, professional integrity, are some factors effective on communication.

Introduction: Development of a faculty evaluation program determines the unique values and priorities of an education institute. Preparation of evaluation questionnaires on the basis of responders" ideals and recognition, accuracy of analyses and practicality of assessment system are effective strategies for success. Elimination of inappropriate or parallel questions will shorten the questionnaires and promotes the evaluation process.

In this study we tried to determine the most important factors pertinent to faculty evaluation by students. Methods: We analyzed retrospectively the faculty evaluation data gathered by questionnaires and completed by clinical students. Both the questions and answers recorded to a computer data bank with omission of the name, specialty and department of the faculty. SPSS statistical software was used for data analysis. The last question of the student questionnaire that inquired the overall effectiveness of the person was used for correlation to other questions.

The multivariate regression model was used for determination of the least effective questions. Results: A total of 10624 questionnaires had been collected from students for evaluation of clinical members during the years 1996 till 1999.

Of these 10346 which had an answer to the last question "What is your overall assessment of this attending teacher?" were used for this study. Of course the score of this question showed the strongest correlation with the average score of the form (r=0.93).

So it was used as an index for overall assessment of the faculty member. The scores given to the other questions of the form were correlated with score of this question. All of the questions showed statistically significant correlation with the reference question. The highest correlation coefficients were in the questions "Ability to motivate the student in scientific ground" (r=0.820), "Guidance of the student in scientific and research needs" (r=0.806) and “fluency and clarity in his discussions & lectures...." (r=0.805).

Multivariate regression analysis showed that the questions “Use of available teaching aids", "Teaching the emergency and common problems" and ability to interpret the Para clinical workups" had no statistical significance in determining the overall effectiveness of the teacher. In summarizing the questions to three aspects of "scientific knowledge", "educational efficacy" and “interpersonal behavior" and their correlation to overall assessment; the scientific knowledge showed the weakest correlation.

Conclusion: Use of too many questions in the structure of the questionnaire will not have any additional data except for a vague repetition of previous responses. The overall assessment of the students of their faculty is based mainly on fluency in their discussions, clarity of the materials and lectures, guidance of the student and appropriate interpersonal behavior which can positively affect them. Caring has been cited by many authors as the core value of nurse educator-student relationships.

Others have discussed the need for caring to be translated and transmitted in the practices of nursing education. However, a clear conceptualization of what caring in nursing education is and how it is transmitted to students does not yet exist. The following is an exploration of the concept of caring in nursing education as it is revealed in nursing research and literature.

The authors present a critical analysis of the definitions, objectives, attributes and constraints of caring in nursing education. What is currently known and perceived about caring in nursing education, as well as what is not known and what needs to be known, is highlighted. Imperatives for future research are identified. This study investigates the effects of a brief training programme on the communication skills of doctors in ambulatory care settings in Trinidad and Tobago.

Evaluation of doctor performance is based on analysis of audiotapes of doctors with their patients during routine clinic visits and on patient satisfaction ratings. A pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental study design was used to evaluate the effects of exposure to the training programme.

Doctors were assigned to groups based on voluntary participation in the programme. Audiotapes of the 15 participating doctors (nine trained and six control) with 75 patients at baseline and 71 patients at the post-training assessment were used in this analysis. The audiotapes were content-coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Doctors trained in communication skills used significantly more target skills post-training than their untrained colleagues. Trained doctors used more facilitations in their visits and more open-ended questions than other doctors.

There was also a trend towards more emotional talk, and more close-ended questions. Patients of trained doctors talked more overall, gave more information to their doctors and tended to use more positive talk compared to other patients. Trained doctors were judged as sounding more interested and friendly, while patients of trained doctors were judged as sounding more dominant, responsive and friendly than patients of untrained doctors.

Consistent with these communication differences, patient satisfaction tended to be higher in visits of trained doctors. This paper expands the understanding of student-teacher connection and offers direction for educators in supporting connection as a place of possibility.

The evolution of a humanistic paradigm in nursing education is evident in research exploring student-teacher relationships. Connection is described within humanistic student-teacher relationships, reported as part of experiences of students, educators and clinicians within emancipatory curricula, and emerged as a central metaphor in a metasynthesis of caring in nursing education.

Additionally, student-teacher connection in clinical nursing education has been reported as creating positive outcomes for students' learning experiences and professional socialization. In this paper, student-teacher connection is envisioned as having a value beyond these tangible outcomes - a value that arises from the essence of connection itself. The qualities inherent in the essence of connection - knowing, trust, respect and mutuality - create a transformative space in which students are affirmed, gain insight into their potential, and grow toward fulfilling personal and professional capacities: student-teacher connection emerges as a place of possibility.

The possibilities that exist for students and teachers in a connected relationship are exemplified as connection is proposed as a cornerstone in supporting students at risk of failing a clinical nursing course. Acknowledging student-teacher connection as a place of possibility highlights the importance of student-teacher relationship to students' learning and raises implications for preparation and evaluation of educators, and educational practice within the international nursing arena.

Of note is the need for the preparation of educators to include a focus of developing relational competence as well as evaluation processes that consider the teacher-in-relationship. Regardless of the educational setting, educators are challenged to consider their beliefs and actions and the influence these exert on relationships with students. Further research exploring specific possibilities within connection is required.

Abstract: Students with learning disorders display weaker capability than their mental and dynamic ability. If these problems are not corrected, they produce lifelong effect on individuals that it seems to be more than disability in reading, writing, and arithmetic skills, and then learning disabilities can influence on mental health and mental status.

The cooperation of student, teacher and parent is needed to treat a learning disturbance. Therefore, establishing an effective communication will guarantee the success of reformative process.

This study was done to determine parents’ view of students with learning disabilities about the factors influencing on communication between the students’ parents and their teachers.

Methods- This cross-sectional study has been implemented in 2010 among 81 of persons who refer to the center of learning disabilities Dehkhoda. Samples were selected by the method of availability. Data were collected by the questionnaire included two types of questions related to individual characteristic and the factors affecting on communication. Descriptive information was adjusted and reported in the way of percentage and ranking.

The analytical examination of the chi-square test and multi-way analysis of variance were used to analyze data. All statistical analyses were performed with the SPSS (Version 19) software package.ConclusionThe parents believe that timely and appropriate openness, modesty, confidentialness, professional integrity, are some factors effective on communication.

Abstract Purposes: Communication ability is an important skill for human beings. Effective education depends on the correct application of communication skills. Communication occurs as teacher-student exchange of thoughts and information in educational process. This study is aimed at determining LD student viewpoints on effective factors in student-teacher communications. Methodology: This descriptive-crus sectional study was undertaken at Dehkhoda Center for Learning Disorders, Iran in 181 registered students there in 2013.

The data was collected through a two-part questionnaire including a part on individual traits and some questions on effective factors in communication establishment, and was analyzed using SPSS21. Findings: Comparing different student groups, their views were almost the same and 2011 and 2012 entrants were only significantly different regarding openness () and communication experience () effects.

Conclusion: According to students, teacher's fitting openness, meekness, secrecy, and trusteeship contribute greatly to student-teacher communication establishment in line with learning enhancement. Keywords: Communication skill, LD students, education


How Are You Smart? What Students with Learning Disabilities are Teaching Us
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