Best why dating is hard in vancouver island bc

best why dating is hard in vancouver island bc

Both Vancouver and British Columbia were hit by the global recession. Hovever, British Columbia’s unemployment rates tend to be consistently lower than the Canadian average. Vancouver hosted the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic winter game. The The Olympic Village is now a mixed-use community, with approximately 1,100 residential units, area parks, and a growing number of retail and service outlets.

best why dating is hard in vancouver island bc

Devote a day to Victoria's picturesque . Here you'll find popular sites like the and the , as well as cafes and restaurants boasting wonderful views of the water. After you've exhausted central Victoria, get a feel for British Columbia's natural side: Spend some time at the renowned , hike through or enjoy a ferry ride to nearby (and keep your eyes peeled for whales).

Just make sure you save an afternoon for the , where dozens of small vineyards offer tours and tastings. . The Inner Harbour is Victoria's primary tourist neighborhood. The harbor itself – home to various fishing boats and colorful floating homes – is framed by wide pedestrian streets, often frequented by street vendors and buskers. Numerous cafes and restaurants line the sidewalks and provide the perfect locale to savor an afternoon cup of tea while keeping your eyes peeled for whales playing in the open water.

The Inner Harbour also hosts some of Victoria's most popular attractions, including the and the . If you're embarking on a boat or ferry tour, this is where you'll likely start your journey. The Inner Harbour is Victoria's primary tourist neighborhood. The harbor itself – home to various fishing boats and colorful floating homes – is framed by wide pedestrian streets, often frequented by street vendors and buskers. Numerous cafes and restaurants line the sidewalks and provide the perfect locale to savor an afternoon cup of tea while keeping your eyes peeled for whales playing in the open water.

The Inner Harbour also hosts some of Victoria's most popular attractions, including the and the . If you're embarking on a boat or ferry tour, this is where you'll likely start your journey.

These world-renowned gardens have impressed Victoria visitors since 1904. Resting on 55 acres about 15 miles north of the , Butchart Gardens were carefully constructed by Jennie Butchart on her husband's former limestone quarry.

Today, more than 1 million people stop by each year to meander along the property's flower-lined paths, which contain more than 900 varities.

Visit on a summer evening to see the gardens illuminated by colored lights and to enjoy some musical entertainment. If you're planning a summer visit and want to avoid the crowds, heed the advice of garden staff and stop by before 10:30 a.m.

or after 3:30 p.m. These world-renowned gardens have impressed Victoria visitors since 1904. Resting on 55 acres about 15 miles north of the , Butchart Gardens were carefully constructed by Jennie Butchart on her husband's former limestone quarry. Today, more than 1 million people stop by each year to meander along the property's flower-lined paths, which contain more than 900 varities. Visit on a summer evening to see the gardens illuminated by colored lights and to enjoy some musical entertainment.

If you're planning a summer visit and want to avoid the crowds, heed the advice of garden staff and stop by before 10:30 a.m. or after 3:30 p.m. The British Columbia Parliament Buildings are hard to miss. These neo-baroque structures with their impressive blue dome face off against Victoria's famed Fairmont Empress Hotel and make an excellent backdrop for an Inner Harbour stroll, especially at night when the facade is dressed in lights.

But if you want a closer look at the building (which dates back to 1898), the parliamentary process and the history of the province, many travelers recommend a tour, raving about the well-informed guides. Although you can take a self-guided tour, you should consider tagging along on a free guided tour, according to recent visitors. The British Columbia Parliament Buildings are hard to miss. These neo-baroque structures with their impressive blue dome face off against Victoria's famed Fairmont Empress Hotel and make an excellent backdrop for an Inner Harbour stroll, especially at night when the facade is dressed in lights.

But if you want a closer look at the building (which dates back to 1898), the parliamentary process and the history of the province, many travelers recommend a tour, raving about the well-informed guides. Although you can take a self-guided tour, you should consider tagging along on a free guided tour, according to recent visitors. The Royal British Columbia Museum offers visitors a comprehensive introduction to the region's history and culture. Exhibits include tribal artifacts from the First Nations, natural history displays and even replicas of Colonial-era settlements.

The museum also boasts an IMAX theater and rotating special exhibits. The Royal British Columbia Museum offers visitors a comprehensive introduction to the region's history and culture. Exhibits include tribal artifacts from the First Nations, natural history displays and even replicas of Colonial-era settlements. The museum also boasts an IMAX theater and rotating special exhibits. Located about 11 miles northwest of the , Goldstream Provincial Park houses a stunning array of flora and abundant natural beauty across its nearly 1,000 acres.

But the real reason to visit this public wildlife area is rather fishy: Spend some time by the Goldstream River from late fall to early winter, and you're bound to catch a glimpse of the annual salmon migration.

Between October and December, chum, coho and chinook salmon can be seen leaping upstream to their ancestral spawning beds. The park's trails follow the river closely, allowing you to get a good look at the watery highway. Located about 11 miles northwest of the , Goldstream Provincial Park houses a stunning array of flora and abundant natural beauty across its nearly 1,000 acres. But the real reason to visit this public wildlife area is rather fishy: Spend some time by the Goldstream River from late fall to early winter, and you're bound to catch a glimpse of the annual salmon migration.

Between October and December, chum, coho and chinook salmon can be seen leaping upstream to their ancestral spawning beds. The park's trails follow the river closely, allowing you to get a good look at the watery highway. Sitting on the eastern edge of Vancouver Island's Strathcona Provincial Park, the Mount Washington Alpine Resort is one of the region's most prominent ski areas. And it's easy to see why: The resort boasts 81 alpine runs and 1,657 feet of vertical drop.

Couple that with an average 38 feet of annual snowfall and you've got a powder hound's paradise. Recent travelers who visited during ski season said the resort is small, but well-groomed and family-friendly, calling it a "gem." Sitting on the eastern edge of Vancouver Island's Strathcona Provincial Park, the Mount Washington Alpine Resort is one of the region's most prominent ski areas. And it's easy to see why: The resort boasts 81 alpine runs and 1,657 feet of vertical drop.

Couple that with an average 38 feet of annual snowfall and you've got a powder hound's paradise. Recent travelers who visited during ski season said the resort is small, but well-groomed and family-friendly, calling it a "gem." Challenging the from across the is the elegant Fairmont Empress hotel. Built in the early 20th century, the Empress is one of the region's oldest hotels.

But while the interior decoration is worth a photo or two, the main reason to visit this colossal hotel (if you aren’t staying there) is for the tea.

The Empress has been participating in this time-honored Victorian tradition since opening its doors, and according to travel experts and recent visitors, teatime continues to be a decadent affair here. (Fun fact: The tea served at the Empress is the hotel's own specially crafted brand.) Challenging the from across the is the elegant Fairmont Empress hotel. Built in the early 20th century, the Empress is one of the region's oldest hotels. But while the interior decoration is worth a photo or two, the main reason to visit this colossal hotel (if you aren’t staying there) is for the tea.

The Empress has been participating in this time-honored Victorian tradition since opening its doors, and according to travel experts and recent visitors, teatime continues to be a decadent affair here. (Fun fact: The tea served at the Empress is the hotel's own specially crafted brand.) Though you may be able to spot whales from the ferry, you'll have the best chance of seeing them during an organized whale-watching tour. Plus, you'll benefit from knowledgeable guides who have access to the Race Rocks Ecological Reserve, which sits on the southernmost part of Vancouver Island (and Canada) on the Pacific coast.

Though you may be able to spot whales from the ferry, you'll have the best chance of seeing them during an organized whale-watching tour. Plus, you'll benefit from knowledgeable guides who have access to the Race Rocks Ecological Reserve, which sits on the southernmost part of Vancouver Island (and Canada) on the Pacific coast. British Columbia is peppered with vineyards. To snag a taste of BC vino (and maybe even a few bottles to bring home), spend a day or two in the Cowichan Valley – second only to the Okanagan as the province's highest producing wine region.

Occupying the heart of Vancouver Island – roughly 35 miles northwest of Victoria – the Cowichan Valley is home to a variety of different wineries and tasting rooms. The best way to get a feel for this part of the island is to stop at several vineyards for a tasting. Or, to participate in the region's annual wine festival, plan to visit in late August.

British Columbia is peppered with vineyards. To snag a taste of BC vino (and maybe even a few bottles to bring home), spend a day or two in the Cowichan Valley – second only to the Okanagan as the province's highest producing wine region. Occupying the heart of Vancouver Island – roughly 35 miles northwest of Victoria – the Cowichan Valley is home to a variety of different wineries and tasting rooms. The best way to get a feel for this part of the island is to stop at several vineyards for a tasting.

Or, to participate in the region's annual wine festival, plan to visit in late August. To sample the Victorian high life, head about a mile east of the to Craigdarroch Castle, a National Historic Site. This impressive home was built in the late 1800s for coal tycoon Robert Dunsmuir.

Although it's more of a mansion than a castle, it houses 39 rooms, each of which is decked out in furnishings from the turn of the 20th century. Another highlight are the more than 30 gorgeous stained glass windows, the majority of which illustrate floral themes. To sample the Victorian high life, head about a mile east of the to Craigdarroch Castle, a National Historic Site. This impressive home was built in the late 1800s for coal tycoon Robert Dunsmuir.

Although it's more of a mansion than a castle, it houses 39 rooms, each of which is decked out in furnishings from the turn of the 20th century. Another highlight are the more than 30 gorgeous stained glass windows, the majority of which illustrate floral themes. This little community on the southern tip of Vancouver Island makes for a quaint and quiet alternative to Victoria. Sooke's sheltered harbor is filled with fishing boats rather than tourists, and its numerous parks provide a scenic backdrop for hiking, biking and horseback riding.

Recent visitors enjoyed the East Sooke Regional Park, citing its beauty and peaceful setting. You'll also find an assortment of water activities here – including fishing, sailing and whale watching – thanks to the town's location on the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

This little community on the southern tip of Vancouver Island makes for a quaint and quiet alternative to Victoria. Sooke's sheltered harbor is filled with fishing boats rather than tourists, and its numerous parks provide a scenic backdrop for hiking, biking and horseback riding.

Recent visitors enjoyed the East Sooke Regional Park, citing its beauty and peaceful setting. You'll also find an assortment of water activities here – including fishing, sailing and whale watching – thanks to the town's location on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. While you wouldn't normally relate Canada with the jungle, the tropical wetlands thrive in the Victoria Butterfly Gardens. As its name suggests, this indoor facility is home to thousands of butterflies spread across its 12,000 square feet.

But they aren't the only critters: The gardens also host a variety of birds and fish, including flamingos and koi fish. You'll find all of these creatures mingling amid the flora, creating a vibrant, colorful atmosphere. What's more, the gardens also house an insectarium with insects and invertebrates from around the globe. While you wouldn't normally relate Canada with the jungle, the tropical wetlands thrive in the Victoria Butterfly Gardens.

As its name suggests, this indoor facility is home to thousands of butterflies spread across its 12,000 square feet.

But they aren't the only critters: The gardens also host a variety of birds and fish, including flamingos and koi fish. You'll find all of these creatures mingling amid the flora, creating a vibrant, colorful atmosphere.

What's more, the gardens also house an insectarium with insects and invertebrates from around the globe. If you're traveling to Victoria with kids in tow (or even without), many recent visitors recommended a stop at the Victoria Bug Zoo. Located a block or so north of the , this fairly small facility is home to a large number of creepy crawlies. Here, you'll come face to face with gigantic walking sticks, furry tarantulas and even glow-in-the-dark scorpions.

If you're traveling to Victoria with kids in tow (or even without), many recent visitors recommended a stop at the Victoria Bug Zoo.

Located a block or so north of the , this fairly small facility is home to a large number of creepy crawlies. Here, you'll come face to face with gigantic walking sticks, furry tarantulas and even glow-in-the-dark scorpions. Miniature World continues to delight the young and the young at heart with its numerous tiny worlds. Sitting just a short walk from the , this interactive museum houses dozens of miniature displays and dioramas.

Follow the model Canadian railway as it travels across the country or spend some time at the big top in the "Circus World" display. If you are a literary buff, you'll appreciate a glimpse of the world of Dickens, while time travel aficionados should check out the "Space 2201 A.D." display. Miniature World continues to delight the young and the young at heart with its numerous tiny worlds. Sitting just a short walk from the , this interactive museum houses dozens of miniature displays and dioramas.

Follow the model Canadian railway as it travels across the country or spend some time at the big top in the "Circus World" display. If you are a literary buff, you'll appreciate a glimpse of the world of Dickens, while time travel aficionados should check out the "Space 2201 A.D." display.


best why dating is hard in vancouver island bc

best why dating is hard in vancouver island bc - Online Dating in Vancouver


best why dating is hard in vancouver island bc

The simple response to such a question is - just look at a map! It’s easy, and will clearly show that Vancouver and Vancouver Island are two different places - both of which are in the state of British Columbia. One is a city, and it’s on the Canadian mainland, the other is one of the Canadian islands………the clue is in the name! No. It’s simple — there’s many things: topographical places, Mountains, islands, cities, etc.

named after Captain George Vancouver. Generally most of the places and things are in and around the Pacific Northwest of North America where he & his crew onboard the Royal Naval ship, HMCS DISCOVERY, embarked on the most thorough research & study of this region. His skills at navigation and cartography so brilliant & ahead of his time - his navigational charts were so accurate that they were in use well into the 20th Century.

The man was a genius. It’s not that difficult to comprehend why so many things were named after this exceptional human being. And unlike his mentor Cptn. Cook - Vancouver learned to be diplomatic and kind to the natives/First Nations peoples he encountered along the west coast of North America. The most famous encounter was in June of 1792, in what would become known as “English Bay” in the future city of Vancouver CANADA … whereby he & crew encountered Spaniards and exchanged ideas/ charts - the Spaniards handed over their rather crude inaccurate cartography results (much of which Vancouver had to rechart, replot, & correct) - anyway that’s why southwestern BC & Northwest Washington state has many islands & waterways named after the Spaniards — although the Spaniards weren’t impressed with BC nor its natives* — Vancouver & crew seemed to feel quite at home (climate similar to Britain) so — you know — that’s how it became know as British Columbia.

FYI: Vancouver Island was originally called “Vancouver’s Island” — and was for quite a number of years a completely separate Crown Colony /Territory distinctively different from mainland BC. side note: ~> ( I still think it should have remained a separate province in Canada because Vsncouver Island is so wonderfully distinct and unique with its own ways).

*footnote: Cptn Vancouver was certainly nicer towards the natives than the Spaniards who historically treated indigenous peoples of North & South America like trash. And there’s no disputing the atrocities the Spaniards did — complete genocide — slaughtering the great civilizations of The Incas, the Mayans & the Aztecs.


best why dating is hard in vancouver island bc

Vancouver Island is a large island located off the west coast of North America, between British Columbia and Washington State. It’s where you will find incredible national parks, BC’s capital city, secluded resorts, and pretty coastal towns. Here are 12 reasons why you should visit at least once in your lifetime. Easy access from the mainland The first reason why you should visit Vancouver Island is that it’s so easy to reach from the mainland; therefore, you can’t use travel time as an excuse.

Several ferries depart from both British Columbia and Washington daily, and they arrive in various places on Vancouver Island as well, such as downtown Victoria, Sidney, Swartz Bay (30 minutes from Victoria), and Nanaimo. There’s also the option of taking a seaplane, from both Seattle and Vancouver. A BC Ferry heading to Vancouver Island | © Hayley Simpson Whale-watching Due to its position in the Pacific Ocean south of Alaska, Vancouver Island is one of the world’s top whale-watching destinations.

Peak whale-watching season is from May until October when there’s a 95% chance of seeing orcas, as well as grey, minke, and humpback whales.

Several offer whale-watching excursions in Victoria, and elsewhere on the island. From zodiacs to cruisers to kayaks, there’s a whale-watching experience to suit everyone. Victoria Victoria is British Columbia’s capital and one of the prettiest towns you will ever see. From the architecture to the floral hanging baskets to its waterfront location, it’s a city you have to visit once in your lifetime.

There are plenty of , such as visiting the Royal BC Museum, Butchart Gardens, Fisherman’s Wharf, and Beacon Hill Park. The city also has many pubs and cafés, and Tea at the Empress is an afternoon tea enjoyed by all, including royals and celebrities, who visit Victoria. Victoria’s Inner Harbour | © Hayley Simpson Mild Canadian weather If Canada’s harsh winters scare you, don’t fret. Victoria actually holds the title of Canada’s mildest winter.

The city’s southern position also means it receives considerably less rain than Tofino on the west coast. Both places have an average winter temperature of 7°C (45°F), and Victoria’s average summer temperature is 22°C (72°F).

However, if you want to view wildlife, spring is the best time to visit. Tofino Speaking of Tofino, it’s one of the most popular destinations on Vancouver Island. The small town is known as both Canada’s surfing capital and a in winter. No matter whether you’re into kayaking, wildlife-watching, fishing, hiking, or surfing, you can do it all in tiny Tofino. It’s also a great place to learn more about the island’s First Nations history.

The town is known as a foodie hot spot too, with popular options being , , and . Sunset in Tofino | Pacific Rim National Park Reserve Pacific Rim National Park Reserve is the first, and oldest, national park reserve, established in 1970. It comprises three primary sections: Long Beach, the Broken Islands, and the West Coast Trail.

It’s characterized by its rugged and rocky coastline, as well as its temperate rainforest. Even though you need to wear a wetsuit year-round at Long Beach, it has some of the best surf in Canada. Meanwhile, the is a multi-day hike and 75-kilometer (47-mile) trail. Free Spirit Spheres A visit to Vancouver Island means having the chance to stay in a unique accommodation option: .

Located in the rainforest near Qualicum Beach, there are three suspended spherical on the property. Named Eve, Eryn, and Melody, the spheres are cozy, but Eryn can sleep up to three people. Tom Chudleigh created the treehouses, which are a perfect way for people to soak up Vancouver Island’s natural beauty. , +1 250 757 9445 Free Spirit Spheres | Natural surroundings There’s no doubt about it—Vancouver Island has stunning natural surroundings. No matter what kind of outdoor adventure you want to have, you can have every type of experience on the island.

For example, you can surf at the Canadian surf capital, view wildlife (including bears, birds, and marine life), hike along rugged coastlines, escape to , and wander through thick forests and rainforests. Vancouver Island is a nature and outdoor lover’s paradise.

Cowichan Valley Cowichan Valley is conveniently located between Victoria and Nanaimo and enjoys Canada’s warmest mean temperature. This climate equals ideal growing conditions, so the area is naturally home to award-winning wineries, BC’s first cidery, and the island’s best farmers market, located in Duncan. Even if you’re not a food and wine enthusiast, there are plenty of towns to explore in Cowichan Valley, including Chemainus, Cowichan Bay, Duncan, and Ladysmith.

Cowichan Bay | © Hayley Simpson Mount Washington Alpine Resort Although Vancouver Island is known for its mild climate, visitors can still hit the slopes on the island. is the island’s largest year-round resort for skiing, snowboarding, mountain biking, and hiking.

It has 82 runs and 10 lifts. Approximately 35% of the runs are classified as intermediate, while 40% are advanced. There aren’t a lot of slopes for beginners. Nevertheless, you can really do it all on Vancouver Island. The hiking There are many hikes to tackle on Vancouver Island. As previously mentioned, there’s the West Coast Trail in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, which is best for more experienced hikers. The in Ucluelet has three sections and is a local favorite for its views and variety.

There’s also the Juan de Fuca Marine Trail on the west coast, which is a 47-kilometer (29-mile) trail from China Beach to Botanical Beach. Other options include the Cape Scott Trail and hikes within Mount Douglas Park. Wild Pacific Trail views | Cathedral Grove Located in , Cathedral Grove is a beautiful part of Vancouver Island. The grove is a unique and endangered part of an ancient Douglas-fir ecosystem. Cathedral Grove’s biggest and oldest trees are over 800 years old and can reach up to 75 meters (250 ft) in height and stretch nine meters (29 ft) in circumference.

There are trails around the area too, which allow you to get up close to this incredible ecosystem.


Tofino Hot Spring Cove - Vancouver, Island Adventure
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